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#3192968 - 02/15/19 09:56 AM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: wileC]
Bob_Atl Offline
Die Hard Member III

Registered: 01/09/15
Posts: 2229
Loc: in the field, or not..
Originally Posted By: wileC
So I would assume the FPS numbers you get from a reloading manual would be a regulated temp of say 70 degrees?

As good an assumption as any,,, works for me.
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#3192995 - 02/15/19 12:39 PM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: Hcboy]
Plant.One Offline
Die Hard Member with a vengeance

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 4478
Loc: Oakland County, MI
hornady doesnt list that data in their books that i can see, but i'm sure a quick note to tech support would get the info.
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All reloading info shared is based on my experiences in my guns. Follow safe reloading practice and work up loads from published minimum data.
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#3205029 - 06/01/19 04:29 PM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: Hcboy]
Don Fischer Offline
Die Hard Member

Registered: 12/19/09
Posts: 502
Loc: Antelope, Ore
I have heard about temperature sensitive powder since I started reloading. That was about 1966! I have never run into a problem that I'm aware of with any powder. I suspect temp can make a difference but I have never noticed it. I have never loaded and worked up loads in freezing weather, I like spring weather for working up loads. I have never hunted in weather in the 90+ range either. Make's me sweat to much. I just don't see this as being the problem it's made out to be but I do guarantee you one thing. You think you need it and someone is gonna develop it for you for a price! Manufacturer's are much more tuned into what you want than what you really need!

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#3205157 - 06/03/19 08:30 PM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: Hcboy]
Hellgate Online
Die Hard Member

Registered: 08/28/12
Posts: 507
Loc: Orygun
I worked up a load (as recommended in Bob Hagel's book on practical ballistics for the N. American Hunter) which was on the upper end of the charts. Actually, exceeding the charts and managed to blow primers and seize the bolt on a Remington 788 .223. I worked up the load in the winter and shot in July using W748 powder. I'll never do that again.
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The AR-15= BARBIE for men

With over 15 percussion revolvers I've been called the Imelda Marcos of Cap & Ball

If you do not subscribe to a newspaper you are uninformed. If you do subscribe to a newspaper you are misinformed. Mark Twain

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#3205161 - 06/03/19 09:15 PM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: Don Fischer]
reb8600 Offline
Global Moderator

Registered: 10/13/04
Posts: 11058
Loc: Morgan, Utah
Originally Posted By: Don Fischer
I have heard about temperature sensitive powder since I started reloading. That was about 1966! I have never run into a problem that I'm aware of with any powder. I suspect temp can make a difference but I have never noticed it. I have never loaded and worked up loads in freezing weather, I like spring weather for working up loads. I have never hunted in weather in the 90+ range either. Make's me sweat to much. I just don't see this as being the problem it's made out to be but I do guarantee you one thing. You think you need it and someone is gonna develop it for you for a price! Manufacturer's are much more tuned into what you want than what you really need!


So you have never worked up a load in the winter or shot in 90+ degree weather but say that temp tolerant powder is not an issue. I have done both and can tell you that some are real sensitive to temperature fluctuations.

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#3211610 - 09/04/19 11:09 AM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: Hcboy]
ackleyman Online
PM senior

Registered: 01/08/03
Posts: 8784
Loc: Hickville
Those of us older folks learned a long time ago that it is best to have a hot weather load and a cold weather load, and ask God for the Common sense to know the difference.

I and partners shot 748,335, Win 760, and AA2700 going from 75*-100*, but we knew how to deal with it, the bonus was long barrel life.

Old time favorites like IMR 3031,4895, 4064, 4350 all had at least a .5g pressure spike, so backing off the load a tad was always in order for red hot dog towns...literally.

So, Hellgate, you know how all of old pharts dealt with this through the years. It takes shooting a rifle in the Winter, then again in the Summer recording loads and we used an Ohler 33. The accuracy node was usually at a particular speed.

So, to make the load development easy, we backed off the COLD weather load 2.0--2.5g in hot weather and worked up. When we hit the Winter time accuracy(speed), Accuracy was back again!!! Dumb butt simple! This aint even close to rocket science.

Now, for all of those that have drank the Kool Aid that the NON temp sensitive powder are not sensitive to hot and cold weather...well, You are probably not using a chronograph and shooting very small groups.

If I were out to get a one load do all, I would go to the Enduron series of powders, and look no further. I have found that H4895, Varget, and H4350 do vary from very cold to very hot weather(32-95*) when you are looking for bug hole groups. Varget burns ungodly hot, another issue when it comes to cleaning hard cooked on carbon out of the barrel .

There is a heat index for various powders, and I hope you will take this index to heart as it is will bring front and center how a powder choice will burn up a barrel quicker/slower. Don't confuse the burning rate chart with heat index chart.

Learning to reload is a life time hobby with all of it's various tid bits of information that will add to your education of being your own
ballistician.


Edited by ackleyman (09/04/19 11:16 AM)

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#3233657 - 02/14/20 07:47 AM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: reb8600]
longrange454 Offline
Seasoned Member

Registered: 12/27/07
Posts: 464
Loc: N.W. ILLINIOS
Originally Posted By: reb8600
Originally Posted By: Don Fischer
I have heard about temperature sensitive powder since I started reloading. That was about 1966! I have never run into a problem that I'm aware of with any powder. I suspect temp can make a difference but I have never noticed it. I have never loaded and worked up loads in freezing weather, I like spring weather for working up loads. I have never hunted in weather in the 90+ range either. Make's me sweat to much. I just don't see this as being the problem it's made out to be but I do guarantee you one thing. You think you need it and someone is gonna develop it for you for a price! Manufacturer's are much more tuned into what you want than what you really need!


So you have never worked up a load in the winter or shot in 90+ degree weather but say that temp tolerant powder is not an issue. I have done both and can tell you that some are real sensitive to temperature fluctuations.
Most definetly so. Found that out using AA2520. May not be such an issue on deer sized game or larger, but on coyote and smaller . Yes.

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#3248017 - 07/08/20 09:17 PM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: Hcboy]
ackleyman Online
PM senior

Registered: 01/08/03
Posts: 8784
Loc: Hickville
Varget and H4895 eats barrels like you are shooting battery acid, special purpose powders only!!!!


Seems like no body has any common sense these days!


Edited by ackleyman (07/08/20 09:19 PM)

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#3248118 - 07/10/20 06:34 PM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: longrange454]
Plant.One Offline
Die Hard Member with a vengeance

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 4478
Loc: Oakland County, MI
Originally Posted By: longrange454
Most definetly so. Found that out using AA2520. May not be such an issue on deer sized game or larger, but on coyote and smaller . Yes.



i made a post elsewhere, but happened to see your note on 2520... there;s a recall just issued a few days ago on that powder.

http://blog.westernpowders.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Recall-7-3-2020.jpg

hth

stay safe!
_________________________
All reloading info shared is based on my experiences in my guns. Follow safe reloading practice and work up loads from published minimum data.
This disclaimer will self destruct in 10 seconds.


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#3259619 - 12/04/20 01:51 PM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: reb8600]
Zastava223rem Offline
Seasoned Member

Registered: 10/19/14
Posts: 325
Loc: Pennsylvania
Originally Posted By: reb8600
Originally Posted By: Don Fischer
I have heard about temperature sensitive powder since I started reloading. That was about 1966! I have never run into a problem that I'm aware of with any powder. I suspect temp can make a difference but I have never noticed it. I have never loaded and worked up loads in freezing weather, I like spring weather for working up loads. I have never hunted in weather in the 90+ range either. Make's me sweat to much. I just don't see this as being the problem it's made out to be but I do guarantee you one thing. You think you need it and someone is gonna develop it for you for a price! Manufacturer's are much more tuned into what you want than what you really need!


So you have never worked up a load in the winter or shot in 90+ degree weather but say that temp tolerant powder is not an issue. I have done both and can tell you that some are real sensitive to temperature fluctuations.


Yep, just about any Ball powder comes to mind. A Max load of H335 developed in 50 degree weather sure does change in 92 degree summer heat.
_________________________
Varmint Rifle Stable
-Sako 85S SS Varmint .22-250 Rem Vortex Gen II Viper PST 5-25x50
-Sako 85S SS Varmint .243 Win Leupold VX-3 8.5-25x50
-Mini Mauser Douglas 26" .223 Rem Leupold VX3i 6.5-20x50
-Sako A7 Coyote .223 Rem Leupold/VX3i 3.5-10x50 CDS

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#3260065 - 12/07/20 08:10 AM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: Hcboy]
6GUNSONLY Offline
Die Hard Member

Registered: 02/06/06
Posts: 744
Loc: NW Alabama
Good info here and food for thought. I don't tend to shoot (rifles, anyway) or hunt in hot weather and my area doesn't have extremely cold weather (we love it if it is actually freezing or below, hunting is usually better), so I guess it's never been a big issue. But something to keep in mind if say, I were going to hunt elsewhere in temps colder than are typical for me. My most used rifle powders recently have been AA-2230 (.223), Reloder 15 (.308), and H-4350 (6.5 Rem. Mag.). I know none of those are "stabilized" powders, but how do those tend to rate on the sensitivity scale?


Edited by 6GUNSONLY (12/07/20 08:43 AM)

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#3260114 - 12/07/20 03:13 PM Re: Temperature sensitivities for powders [Re: 6GUNSONLY]
Zastava223rem Offline
Seasoned Member

Registered: 10/19/14
Posts: 325
Loc: Pennsylvania
Originally Posted By: 6GUNSONLY
Good info here and food for thought. I don't tend to shoot (rifles, anyway) or hunt in hot weather and my area doesn't have extremely cold weather (we love it if it is actually freezing or below, hunting is usually better), so I guess it's never been a big issue. But something to keep in mind if say, I were going to hunt elsewhere in temps colder than are typical for me. My most used rifle powders recently have been AA-2230 (.223), Reloder 15 (.308), and H-4350 (6.5 Rem. Mag.). I know none of those are "stabilized" powders, but how do those tend to rate on the sensitivity scale?


H4350 is actually one of the most stable powders out there right up with Varget. I have heard mixed opinions on RL15, I have 5 lbs but havent tested it yet. Not sure about 2230, is it ball or extruded?
_________________________
Varmint Rifle Stable
-Sako 85S SS Varmint .22-250 Rem Vortex Gen II Viper PST 5-25x50
-Sako 85S SS Varmint .243 Win Leupold VX-3 8.5-25x50
-Mini Mauser Douglas 26" .223 Rem Leupold VX3i 6.5-20x50
-Sako A7 Coyote .223 Rem Leupold/VX3i 3.5-10x50 CDS

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