help new reloaders

Posted by: varmentwacker

help new reloaders - 01/15/07 05:12 PM

i have notice there seems to be a lot of new guys that have started reloading.i think we should let these guys know a few things to keep them safe.here are a few things that i have come up with. 1. always wear eye protection. 2.for you guys that are loading thier on pills right now during the cold months beware with some powders these loads are fine during the winter and cold months but during the hot months they can blow up in your face.i have seen this happen at our local gun range.thank the lord nobody got hurt.i mean there was chunks of the gun missing that could not be found.if you are pushing max loads during the winter do not shoot these during the summer.work some more loads up and pay close attention to the pressure signs.my self if i am using powders that are not extream powders (BL-C2) i try to find a load in the middle so i can use it year round.even at that you will not believe how these loads can change during the summer months.i work up most of my loads during the cold months because it dosent take long for barrell to cool.i am sure there will be a lot added to this but this is a good start.one of my fav sayings.a young man that rolls his own bullets wont be rolling nothing else.i have raised 3 boys and one nephew that proves this right.
Posted by: Wingman26

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 05:22 PM

A lot of new reloaders tend to ignore the advice in the reloading books, you see their posts on various message boards where they have just started loading and went right to the maximum loads listed in the reloading books.

Reloading books list their loads in different ways, some only give the maximum loads and advise to start at 10% lower, and some others list a starting load and a max load, if there is a starting load, use it!

If there is only one load listed, start at 10% LESS, and as mentioned, don't go to max loads in cold weather, it might cause a problem when the weather gets hot.

One of the major things, get a good reloading book and read it!

Here's a good one and it's a new edition, so it's up to date: http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=438424
Posted by: Nic_58

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 05:30 PM

One piece of advice that I think is very important when reloading is to stay focused on the task at hand and not get distracted by the kids, pets, wife, TV, etc.

You need your reloading bench in a place where you can get away from it all so you can keep your attention directed on what you are doing so as not to double charge a case or try to prime a case that's already primed and so on.

Reloading is fun and rewarding but it can be dangerous if you don't pay attention!
Posted by: varmentwacker

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 06:14 PM

this is good stuff lets keep it going.i changed the title so maybe it will get more input.there is a lot of guys that can add to this one.
Posted by: Pickaway Mick

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 08:38 PM

Safety is everything.Velocity isn`t.

Besides....working up loads in small increments is good practice.Uniformity is a must.

Starting loads with just small increments in overall length with firefomed,neck sized brass has proven pretty effective,and easy on the rifle...... and bullet.
Posted by: Totch94

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 08:48 PM

I like it!

I'm a new reloader and I am trying to learn everything I can to get started. Please keep it coming, I'm going to print this out and put it in my reloading books.

Interested in any mistakes you may have made when getting started. Hopefully I can learn from them and not make them myself.
Posted by: broknaero

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 08:59 PM

You guys put in some good stuff. I was going to say what Wingman26 said. Get a good reloading book and read it! not just the loads, but all of it! the steps ,the safety, and how to recognise excessive pressure. A book I reccomend is the ABC's of reloading. Outlines everything you need, and dont need and how to safely use it to get started.

I would aslo add... Be careful of someones "Favorite " loads you get online. Every rifle likes something different. Thats why manuals have a Min. and a Max. load. Stay whithin these lines, they are there for a reason. Also know that too low of a charge can be as dangerous as too hot of a load.

We only get 1 dominant eye!
Posted by: Nic_58

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 09:21 PM

Here's a good link for someone who is just getting started into reloading. Back before the days of the internet, I sent into RCBS and they mailed me out a copy of the Step-By-Step Reloading Guide. It helped me out immensely as I was on my own back then. Here is a link to it online at RCBS's website.....

RCBS Step-By-Step Reloading Guide

You can click on the box in the middle of the page to print it out or just view it step by step by clicking on the links in the left hand column.
Posted by: Sam243

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 09:27 PM

I second the caution regarding "favorite" loads. When I first started I tended to want to test the max loads in the manual. I usually find better accuracy from loads that are dialed down slightly.
Posted by: broknaero

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 09:36 PM

Your right Sam! Alot of times people sacrafice a little accuracy for a little more speed. The max load isnt always the most accurate. A coyote getting hit with my .17Rem doesnt know the difference between 3700fps or 4000fps.

Some loads Ive been offered online are well above or below anything I've ever found posted. The lower, or reduced loads are usualy found when searching for that "fur friendly" load. Especialy with something as fast as a .17Rem Ive looked for a fur friendly load for fox. Ive been given some down right dangerous loads. This is advice you are getting from complete strangers who may or may not know anything about reloading, and may not care about your safety.
Posted by: Jack Roberts

Re: new reloaders - 01/15/07 09:39 PM

The loads listed in a manual may not be safe in your rifle. Depending on lots of things but mostly weather your chamber is larger or smaller than average, max loads may be seriously overpressure. That's why you always have to work up loads.

Jack
Posted by: varmentwacker

Re: new reloaders - 01/16/07 02:33 AM

btt
Posted by: backy33

Re: help new reloaders - 01/16/07 02:48 AM

Can you give me some examples of extreme powders. I know what I need to know to be a safe reloader but I'm no expert on powders and do like to load close to the max load to get a little extra speed for a moving shot if it's needed. What powders are on the safe side and what are hotter burning??? This is something I've always wanted answered but thought this would be a good post to do it. I do understand there are many many powders out there but some examples would be good to open some people's eyes to this important part of reloading.
Posted by: varmentwacker

Re: help new reloaders - 01/16/07 03:30 AM

heres a link. http://www.hodgdon.com/smokeless/extreme/page4.php
Posted by: Varmonter

Re: help new reloaders - 01/16/07 05:56 AM

hodgdons line of extreme powders are not suppose to be effected as much with temp estremes . Remember. As your barrel
heats up depending on how long the new round sits in the chamber it can also get hot.
Posted by: varmentwacker

Re: help new reloaders - 01/16/07 10:22 PM

btt
Posted by: bigjeepman

Re: help new reloaders - 01/17/07 05:05 AM

The advice on getting a manual is very good. I think when you get done reading the first one you buy, you need to buy a second one. I use five different ones just to cross reference with. You will notice different minimum and max load numbers in the manuals. Also use the internet for reading material ... such as the link below. I printed out some of their pages to keep on my reloading wall for quick reference ... such as cartridge length (max and trim to)... they also have a conversion chart that I have found useful.

http://www.reloadbench.com/main.html

Good shooting ... be safe ...
Posted by: bluedog1us

Re: help new reloaders - 01/17/07 03:23 PM

One thing i learned the hard way was that a load which performs well in YOUR rifle, may just be much too hot in another rifle of the same caliber, make and model. So I repeat what others here are saying...WORK UP EACH LOAD!
I shot some reloads my buddy was using in his rifle in mine and separated the case. I was young and foolish then, and was very lucky also. Don't research reloading after all else fails, do the research and studying FIRST.
Posted by: savage99

Re: help new reloaders - 01/17/07 09:02 PM

The one piece of advice I would give would relate to loading for others, be very cautios of this. I had guys coming up to me when they found out I reloaded and saying, "Hey, can I try your load in my rifle, your's shoots well?" NEVER give someone a pet load of your's to try in their gun. Remember, you worked up your load in your gun, where you watched for signs of pressure as you worked it up. I will help family and a few close friends work up a load ONLY if I am there to start low, and inspect the reloads for pressure signs while we shoot and test their rifle together. I would NOT do this if you are just starting out, some folks never do. There are alot of people I WILL NOT do this for, I am very particular about doing this.

The other thing that I think is of the utmost importance is to keep ONE powder and ONE powder only on the bench, the ONE you are working with. DO NOT be afraid to ask for help here, I have exploited the knowledge of the fine folks here for a long time now, they have saved me time, energy, money, and have always kept me pointed in the SAFE direction, Rich.
Posted by: stiff neck

Re: help new reloaders - 01/18/07 01:22 PM

Get lots of advice, but don't trust it. Test everything yourself (with each rifle you load for) starting on the low/safe side and work your way up.
Posted by: blinddog

Re: help new reloaders - 01/18/07 02:55 PM

How many post start with "looking for good load for----"Never use a load that you see on a bbs like this one never use a load that someone says is good. Verify it!!Bullet and powder companies spend millions developing loads and testing them they also spend millions on test equiptment. Use loading manuals. Update your manuals regularly I have been handloading since the 1960's I have a lot of olds manuals that show loads I would not think of useing now a days. Ammunition companies and powder manufacturers use blended powders over time the blends can change slightly. But if your loading max charges a slight increase in powder burn rate can make a drastic differance, so use currant loading manuals. Pet loads may work well for the person who developed them, in one firearm, but in another they could be too hot depending on things like chamber wear exct. Remeber that each rifle , pistol , or shotgun is a law unto itself they are like women in some things what one may like another may hate.

My own rules for handloading
1 Always use eye protection.
2Always use current data, and components
3. Never use data that is from an unknown source.
4 Never use diferant components than what is specified unless working up to a known load. This means that is you are loading from a manual and it says use a CCI SMall rifle primer do not substitute a Fed small rifle mag primer because someone said it works better. In some loads that type substitution can cause major injury to you or your firearm
These are simple rules and have been stated several times in many places
Posted by: IDBob

Re: help new reloaders - 01/18/07 03:43 PM

Best advice I can give is develope a routine and stick to it. This advice is for folks using a single stage press setup. I have both a single stage press and one of Lee's turret presses that I use as a single stage press. I just like having the dies all set up in it's individual turret.

Mine goes something like this:

1. Deprime brass with a Lee depriming die. (this does all sized of cases)

2. I use one of the RCBS case prep stations so I clean the primer pockets and the inside of the necks and do an inside and outside chamfer to the case mouths.

3. Tumble clean, seperate your cases from the media, check primer pockets for stuck media. Be sure and poke out any media that sticks in the primer flash hole. I use a Lee Trimmer. The point just fits thru the primer flash hole.

3. Place in loading blocks and spray with Hornedy one shot sizing lube. I do it from two sides at a 45 degree angle so it gets into the case mouth as well as on the outside of the case.

4. Resize. If your using the Lee collet neck sizing die you do not have to lube. If your using full length sizing dies then the spray lube works good for me. Some folks use Imperial sizing wax and that is also an excellent lube.

5. Put the cases back into the tumbler for an hour to clean the lube off them. Some folks don't do this and it's OK, I just don't like the idea of any excess lube inside or outside of a case thats going into the chamber of my rifles.

6. Prime all the cases. I use a Lee auto-prime and have since they came out. It lets me feel the primer bottom in the case.

7. Charge your cases with powder. I used a standard measure and scale for years, then went to the RCBS electronic dispenser and measure. Very consistant loads, but check on your beam scale once and a while.

8. Once you have powder in your cases and under good light look into all the cases while there sitting in the loading blocks. If there are any gross differences you will be able to see them. I have a four foot double floresent light above my reloading bench. I like to pick up the blocks of cases that I've just charged with powder and tilt them several ways as I look into them.

9. Seat your bullets. I like to try my reloads to see if they function in the rifle. Do this with the safety on and the gun pointed in a direction that would be safe if it went off. If I'm loading lots of varmit rounds I will only try one magazine full.

The idea is to do one step at a time, depriming, case prep, lubing, resizing, priming, powder and bullet seating. Check your work as you go. I find that as I do each step I like to move the cases from one loading block to another. This keeps the confusion of "have I done that row of cases" to a minimum.

Do wear safety glasses.

I like to listen to the country western station (cause I'm old), but televisions are a no-no.

Good luck you new reloaders, crafting your own ammo is a great hobby in its own right.



Posted by: BuzzBee

Re: help new reloaders - 01/18/07 06:20 PM

One more to add to the list.

Try to develop a habit of keeping a record of your loads. Documenting the components & procedure in your reloading not only ensure the consistency (accuracy), itís also a part of the safety measurement. Specially, when you have multiple guns sharing the same caliber.
As you already know, ammo load for one gun may not work well or is safe to shoot in another & cartridge that looks the same can easily get mixed up over time so it's very important for you to keep them apart.

You may use different ammo containers to help you distinguish them, adding a detailed label on each box is indispensable. You should also have a way to ID them once they are removed from the box, it can be done in many ways, I happen to like using different components to tell them apart. For example, I have several guns in .223, to help me I use CCI BR4 primer exclusively in the AR and only Remington 7-1/2 for the bolt guns, the two primers have difference appearance, then between the 2 bolt guns, one shoots the Lapua brass exclusively and the other use Winchester. If you have more, any of the brass/primer/bullet combination also makes it unique.
Posted by: Jim n Iowa

Re: help new reloaders - 01/19/07 07:40 PM

I think IDBob has a good point, a solid routine. On my bench are two signs, one; for what to take to the range (ever forget something?)two; for the procedure of reloading. At one time I thought that I schould load case's in 223 in advance, the problem was I have (2) 223's. So are these ns or fs, or labled. So as was mentioned a loading log, and I use a range log to compare the loads, and post it as to what stage this case is in the system.
I agree one multiple manuals, I stay up to date on Hornady, Sierra, and Speer. Country is OK but so is Jimmy Buffet and Mozart, for reloading.
Jim
Posted by: varmentwacker

Re: help new reloaders - 01/19/07 08:11 PM

need to also keep up with how many times your brass has been reloaded.at some point they are going to go bad.this is something that also veries between guns.i have had brass that i reloaded 9 times and had no problems in one gun while in one of my other guns i would start having problems after 4 reloads.
Posted by: gube204

Re: help new reloaders - 01/21/07 12:30 AM

Need to remember that ladder loading the smaller cartridges is alot different than ladder loading the bigger ones. It is very very easy to suddenly hit high pressure problems with the smaller guys like the 17 and the 204. Ladder loading with these small guys should be .2 gr at a time MAX.
It is very easy to go from a "safe" load to a dangerous "hot" load in just a couple of grains. The bigger calibers are a bit more forgiving in this aspect.
Posted by: broknaero

Re: help new reloaders - 01/21/07 01:30 AM

This is good stuff! I am proud to be a member of this site... everyone who has added has atleast touched on safety. This is'nt like some job requireing you to wear a back belt to lift some stuff. This is people with common sence useing it! Safety is very real when it comes to this stuff. People can, and have been seriously injured or killed from reloading. We learn from they're misfortunes. If we cant learn from an accident then the accident was pointless.

As far a working up loads goes, a good pair of shooting glasses are worth alot more then you paid for them. I dont care how much you pay. They just seem to be one of those things you dont appreciate until you need them. If you dont have them when you need them then its too late. Theres no going back at that point.

Theres alot of bennifits of reloading. But even the most experianced oldtimers doing this forever know that safety is first. They dont take shortcuts and neither should you!
Posted by: RO Rick

Re: help new reloaders - 01/21/07 10:03 PM

Okay I have been reloading for about 20 years now and one of the most valuable tools I have ever purchased was a cronograph. Pressure is what blows up your gun. As velocity increase's so does pressure. Loading manuals give a max velocity as well as a max powder charge. Some guns reach that max velocity max pressure point at somewhat lower powder charge's than what's listed. You need some way to measure this accuratly. I can't count how many time's I have been at the range clocking loads and been approached by some guy wanting to know the velocity of his "pet load". You'd be suprised at how many time's that load clocked over max for that powder/bullet combo. 9 out of 10 time's there were no visable signs of exccesive pressure. But it was there. Be safe get a cronograph. Know for sure your not on the ragged edge.
Posted by: BuzzBee

Re: help new reloaders - 01/21/07 10:52 PM

Not sure your logic makes any sense. Even though pressure and velocity is closely related, but they are also very different and I donít believe a Chrono is a good devise used to measure the load pressure.
Just because a load is below the published velocity, it does not mean itís always safe and vise versa.
The interior of a bore, the dia and twist rate all will affect the velocity. That said, some barrels are faster than the other. Pressure signs are pressure signs, if they are there than you should back off regardless of the velocity reading.
A Chronograph is used to measure the speed of a projectile. I use it to check the uniformity of my loads but itís far from a strain gage which is the devise used to measure the load pressure.
Posted by: varmentwacker

Re: help new reloaders - 01/22/07 03:25 AM

you guys have really come through on this one.MAKES ME PROUD TO BE A MEMBER HERE.i will stress one more time something that has been said in every post SAFTY is the most important thing.if you have any doughs what so ever stop.get on this board and ask someone. matter of fact you can pm me your number and i will be glad to help you any way i can.
Posted by: BuzzBee

Re: help new reloaders - 01/22/07 06:37 PM

There are old-reloaders and there are bold-reloaders, but you won't find any old bold-reloaders.


Don't take load recipes from a person thatís blind in one eye and missing a few fingers.


Speed is nice but accuracy is final.
Posted by: bigmike22

Re: help new reloaders - 01/22/07 11:30 PM

Thanks guys. This is fantastic. I am just getting into predator hunting. And because of this site the desire to reload. All of this information is great. To bad high school and college wasnt this informative. I might have paid a little better attention.
Posted by: t/c223encore

Re: help new reloaders - 01/24/07 12:13 AM

I know I can get any help I need askin questions here, which I'm sure I will be doing. I also can ask my uncle for help if I need it. Bein a member here and reading posts and reading the answers here is what made me finally decide to get my own reloading equipment and start reloading once and for all. By the way, this is a great idea for a post, I'll be keeping track of this one.

t/c223encore.
Posted by: Okiedigger

Re: help new reloaders - 01/25/07 09:35 AM

Lots of good advice here. One little thing I'd like to add that I don't think was mentioned. If you use several different powders, leave the can out that you are using at the time. That way you are sure to get the leftover powder back in the right can. Also remember, The only stupid question is the the one thats not asked. If you are unsure about something, get some help.
Posted by: OldTurtle

Re: help new reloaders - 01/27/07 09:28 AM

For my personal opinion, take the time to find someone in your immediate area that reloads. Whether you run into them at your local range, ask your local reloading supplier, or know them through a friend. This is assuming you have a manual and have read it.

Buy them a cup of coffee and ask them to come over and check out your equipment, help you go through the basics, and if there is some anomoly that pops up, stop and give them a call until you can understand what is happening. I have yet to meet anyone in the shooting community that wasn't willing to get a 'new guy' started on the right path.

I've reloaded straight-wall pistol cases for years and have just started reloading bottle-neck cases (.204 & .223) and have a well respected reloader in the next town (4 mi.) as a mentor. (Sounds odd as I am older than he is ) He's not retired and has his own busy life, but he's always been good for a phone call... or to have me stop by on a weekend or evening.

I agree with everyone else on starting lower than any max. load listed. Don't become a "Speedfreak" at the expense of safety. I like a flat shooting load as much as the next, but I want predictability more.
Posted by: tresmon

Re: help new reloaders - 01/28/07 05:45 PM

I have been reloading for about any and everything "boom" for over 25 years. The one best website i have ever found is here- www.varmintal.com check his relaoding page......
AFTER reading a good reloading manual cover to cover (I recommend the latest Lyman manual, it is like a very rounded text book, not just load recipe's) (Like the other guys posted)

Tres
Posted by: kelbro

Re: help new reloaders - 01/29/07 12:08 AM

Don't get in a hurry. If you don't have enough time to do it right, start the job at another time.

Develop a system or routine. Follow it every time.

A chronograph is one of the most valuable tools. If you are working up a load and see a sudden spike in velocity, you just passed the max load. Doesn't matter what your brass looks like or that your bolt opens easily, it's time to back up a half a grain or so.

Only keep one powder can on the bench at a time.

Don't mix cans of the same brand/type of powder.

Don't pick up used brass. You never know how many times that it has been fired. Brass is relatively cheap, hands and eyes are priceless.

Store your primers separate from your powder.

Have fun. Do it safely. You get a great sense of accomplishment when you shoot that .25" group or fill the freezer with your own custom load.
Posted by: chris112

Re: help new reloaders - 01/31/07 12:47 AM

My first piece of advice is to make sure that the data you are using is for the powder you have, since some companies use the same number as another company for a somewhat different powder (just different enough that the data is not interchangable).

4350 is particularly bad in that respect (3 companies at least) but also 4064, 4831 and 4895 need to be double checked. And those are just from the Lee manual.

The second piece of advice is to be the type of person who learns by reading. And get several different manuals and compare them.
Posted by: Furhunter

Re: help new reloaders - 01/31/07 08:47 PM

I will touch on the record keeping again

For very close record keeping, I have a 3 ring binder for all my reloading info, I like to keep it 1 rifle to 1 book. I print off all my testing targets from the internet, 8 1/2 X 11 sheets, once shot they get 3-hole punched and inserted along with chrony data on that load. The chrony sheet has places for all data along with comments, powder used, charge used, bullet, OAL and temp on that day, you could add wind or other enviromental data, gets alittle deep though for me. There is no question if you tried something before.

The short version
Never throw away those old targets, take a sharpie and write the load data on the target along with a brief comments like pressure signs etc. Use a couple file folders to keep it straight. I have targets from testing going back years, come to think about it......I still have targets from rifles I no longer have I should do something about that!!

Record keeping is just as important as anything else on your bench, it can keep you from wasting time, money, eyes, fingers or worse.
Posted by: Wyocoyoter

Re: help new reloaders - 02/01/07 11:58 AM

Develope a routine and stick to it. Zero your scales periodically.

Buy your bullets, primers, brass & powder in bulk with the same lot numbers.

Good point on saving targets. I also have a target file with notes on each bull as to load, date, outside temp, rifle etc.

Keep your loading bench clean and well organized.
Posted by: lewish11

Re: help new reloaders - 02/04/07 08:51 AM

I haven't been at it that long, but I've found that if I keep my brass neck down until it's charged with powder, I can tell if it's primed, what kind it is and, I'm sure there's no powder in it already.
Posted by: bdld

Re: help new reloaders - 02/05/07 07:57 PM

Lots of good advice here! I've been loading for quite some time and learn something new everyday from PM forums.
Posted by: 351417512

Re: help new reloaders - 02/10/07 01:49 PM

Wanting to load close to max for that little extra speed for a follow-up shot on a running target is not a really valid reason for loading near max. I would keep my loads in the moderate part of the data for accuracy; longer brass life and a little longer barrel life and not have to worry about temperature pressures. Develope and mantaine a safe routine at the loading bench;then when that routine is interupted mental warning bells and whistles go off and that is when you stop and find out why.
Details-details-details; take your time and enjoy all the good things.
.........Chan
Posted by: UncleDoc

Re: help new reloaders - 02/12/07 06:11 PM

I agree whole heartedly about the extreme powders. I try to use them as much as possible. Also, the advise on distractions is right on the money. Pay attention to what you are doing...no radio, no TV, no wife, no beer. I have been doing this for about fifteen years and I can tell you that everyone loves velocity (at first). However, it is rare, extremely rare that you get top velocity and top accuracy with the same load. 2600 fps will kill 'em just as dead as 2800 fps. Accuracy is essential, velocity is optional.
Posted by: Passthru

Re: help new reloaders - 02/13/07 03:43 AM

I always keep a small mag lite flashlight on my bench..the reason is to look inside all my cases after the powder has been dumped into them, Especially Pistol reloads, Double charges of powder are very dangerous and it is all to easy to do...I look down inside the cases with a light and it will stick out like a sore thumb.

This is not a safety thing, but may save you time. Dont handle Primers with your fingers..buy a good hand priming tool and dump the primers into it..oil from your fingers can kill a primer.

You can never have to many manuals..I often cross reference loads in one manual with other manuals and find a middle of the road load to start with and work from there.

NEVER NEVER Mix powders...if powder hits the bench, it gets swept up and thrown away...I knew a guy who decided that he could use powder that he raked into a powder can over a period of time...it was 3 different kinds of powder..I told him many times not to ever do this...well he loaded it up in his Ruger Blackhawk 44 mag one weekend, then came to work and told me his Cylinder blew in half...blamed it on the gun...i asked what powder he used...it was the mixed powder...STUPID is as STUPID does.
He is lucky he didnt get hurt or killed, or someone standing nearby.
Posted by: UncleDoc

Re: help new reloaders - 02/14/07 06:27 AM

I just picked up the new Hornady reloading manual yesterday afternoon and it has been revised to include .204, new .223 and .22-250 stuff, more powder recommendations, and just a ton of good, new stuff. Wish I had access to something that good when I started about 15 or 20 years ago. I highly recommend that manual for anyone starting to reload, or experienced ones for that matter. It's a good one.

I wanted to add...never, never use a vacuum cleaner to clean up powder spilled on the floor or your reloading bench. They build up static electricity and they will make a big boom when they go off. Stay away from them thangs.
Posted by: russell2

Re: help new reloaders - 02/14/07 03:59 PM

My advise for what it is worth....Only One can of powder on your loading bench at a time....Powders don't mix
Posted by: TLT

Re: help new reloaders - 02/24/07 05:21 PM

From what I've learned and seen in my own loads, your best accuracy is below max velocities anyway. I don;t think any of my loads ever got close before accuracy started to wane.

My Dad got me started off reloading my own , and his first and most heartened advice was safety, and thats always first and foremost- its a personal law with me.

Another tidbit, that I havent seen mentioned, it the act of being sure to discharge yourself (of static electricity) before you even start towards powder or primers. Open primers are extremely suseptable to static charge, and a single rifle primer is fully capable of leaving you a finger shorter than when you started.
Posted by: MNSHOOTER

Re: help new reloaders - 02/28/07 05:00 PM

One of the things that I have adapted to after 20 + years of handloading is to do everything in steps !! When you are working on the brass dont have primers and powder laying around and so on . If you work on one task at a time things are much safer. Mark
Posted by: Threewolves

Re: help new reloaders - 03/02/07 01:20 PM

I have only been reloading since 1981. I have some other stories to learn from, but I will break them up on the thread to keep eyes from bleeding. I only have one bad story that involved me, and I intended to keep it that way.

Check flash holes for left over tumbler media. When you take them out of the tumbler LOOK to insure the flash holes are clear over white paper. I have the end of a dart I use for a pick, I also push the dart through the flash hole to CLEAR the flash hole even if it looks clear. Do not just look, clear the hole. I CHECK the flash holes again when I clean the primer pockets over white paper. I CHECK the primer pockets again over white paper prior to putting the primer in. The Story below is why.

About 1989 I was going to the range to shoot my 300 mag. I had an up coming Alaskan Hunt to prep for and I just wanted to shoot. It is good for the heart, mind and soul, keeps the confidence up. I was thinking I might as well take my 22-250 to shoot while I am waiting for my 300ís barrel to cool down. I didnít have any 250 stuff loaded up so I hurried to load up a quick 10 rounds. I got out to the range to do my thing and it is interesting I shot 3 from the 300, 3 from the 250 alternating. I had shot the last set of 3 from the 250, I had the 10th round I pulled the trigger.

I immediately felt hot gas going just below my cheek, I looked at the rifle, the outside looked fine. I could not get the bolt opened. I was finally able to get the bolt open by tapping it open with a block of wood. The case was expanded in the face of the bolt and would not come out. I took the bolt out of the rifle to get the case out of the bolt face. Heck, it was screwed up anyway so I took a pair of vice grips and pulled the case out. The case had expanded so big it looked like you could put a primer in the flash hole.

What happened? Too much powder? Primer pocket loose? Something partially blocking the flash hole? Powder, I donít think so, I could see that in a pistol using light loads, it was my standard load for my 250 the load could not have been doubled it would not fit in the case. Primer pocket loose, if the primer doesnít feel solid going in I disregard the case. Flash hole, I did not recall checking when I grabbed the brass. At the time, I called Jay Postman over at RCBS and ran every thing by him and partially blocked flash hole could do it, so could a loose primer pocket and too much powder. I am thinking blocked flash hole.

I sent my rifle to Remington with the story. (I have had the rifle since 1981 with no problems.) They checked it out and replaced the bolt for a reasonable fee. I still have it, it will still keep three rounds touching at 102 yards shooting off the box of my pickup using a gun case for a pad.

Never be in a hurry reloading, check what you are doing, you will notice it becomes second nature. It is a healthy fear, this situation could have maimed or killed. Thank God for strong weapons. Paul
Posted by: Threewolves

Re: help new reloaders - 03/02/07 01:41 PM

Yep, I have another one. I was living in Fairbanks, Alaska and a buddy of mine (no, really it wasnít me) who was also working for me called and said he could not make it in. He said he had burned his hand. So, that peaked my curiosity. He lived pretty close so I went over to hear the rest of the story.

He had traded a caribou hide for a muzzleloader (really good trade considering we usually just left the hides out on the tundra). So, he had made his own speed loaders and had filled them up for another caribou hunt. He wanted to kill a caribou with his new to him muzzleloader. Oh, he smokes, but being safety conscience he refrained during his project. The black powder that he had spilt on the bench he had cleaned up and put in his ash try. Of course, later on when he was doing something else he was smoking and went to put his cigarette out and FLASH his hand was cooked.

Again, it is healthy fear, to fear things that can be set off by static and cigarettes. Paul
Posted by: Threewolves

Re: help new reloaders - 03/02/07 02:21 PM

Another safety tip. Reloading for accuracy.

Usually the closer the bullet are to the rifling lands the more accurate (refer to Hornaday reloading). Also, the closer the bullet is the higher the pressure is. So, if you are going to do this you have to back off the powder.

Start low, when you see pressure signs like flat primers back off, if the bolts is hard to open stop, and back off. If you have any of your newly discovered hot loads left do not shoot them take them apart.

I reload for accuracy not speed. You may have to drop down 100 fps or more until you get the right combinations accuracy and speed. There are other things you can do like use powders that develop less pressure while giving the same speed. For example if you look at Dupontís hand outs IMR 4831 it develops more pressure pushing 180 grain bullet to 3000 fps than Duponts 7828. Using the 7828 the middle of the road load is what the hot load is for IMR 4831.

From the Speer book 4831 max is 73. grains at 2996 fps
#11 7828 max is 78. grains at 3019
7828 mid is 76. grains at 3004
7828 low is 74. grains at 2977


So, using the mid load I still get the same speed I want with less pressure. Even if I used the low load its is 2977 fps I donít think a elk or moose will know the difference. Now, animals will know the difference if you and your rifle are not accurate, maybe you will miss them or maybe you will make a poor hit. So, Accuracy is more important than speed. Being a little off at 100yds might not be that big of deal, but being off at 400 or 500yds is truly un-ethical.

You have to not only read the reloading books, but also read the handouts provided by the powder manufacture. Paul
Posted by: Threewolves

Re: help new reloaders - 03/02/07 02:23 PM

Can you guys tell I am home recovering from knee surgery. Paul
Posted by: FC363

Re: help new reloaders - 03/23/07 01:37 PM

Get a couple of reloading manuals, and a chronograph. Build some middle of the road loads and see how things compare. it will save alot of frustration later. "Experience conformation of success rather than consequence of failure" is the best advice I ever got.
Posted by: puppyhunter

Re: help new reloaders - 03/28/07 01:25 AM

One mistake that I made about seven years ago was let my young son 14 at the time was to use my equpiment unsupervised. He helped me quite a few times in our basement and in his defense he was a safe kid. I own a Dillion square deal B which is a four stage progressive reloader. For those who don't know it is that after you start loading after the first four rounds, you got all the stations going, you get a loaded round every crank of the handle. I have never had any trouble with my reloader and every thing comes out right on the money.The machine was all set and ready to go,by me,the night before. I only had three pickup tubes ready to go. Thats what holds the primers to load into the main tube, you load the pick up tubes yourself. Anyway my son ran out of primers and took it upon himself to load up a few more tubes. Luckily I came home and went down to the basement while he was on his first tube of fifty. When he loaded the pickup tubes he loaded the primers into them upside down. He had about thirty rounds loaded with the primers fully seated upside down. He said the handle was just a little harder to pull down but didn't give it any thought.Luckily none of them went off and we had another lesson for him to learn. So whether you are only loading a few rounds at a time or able to crank out 600 + an hour take the time to check out whats going on with your ammo instead of waiting till your done and do your final inspection. Could save you a serious injury or death to you or someone you love.
Posted by: Jarhead

Re: help new reloaders - 04/20/07 02:55 PM

I know someone who just scattered a really nice S&W 629 classic 44mag with another persons reloads.

The top 3 cylinders and top strap were completely missing and the barrel almost came off! One of the pieces went through a thick plastic divider that seperates the lanes at the indoor range. Luckily nobody was hurt but the pistol is most likely now a parts gun.

When I was young I bought a really nice Remington PSS in .308 and a friend of mine, who had been relaoding for decades, gave me some rounds. Being a complete novice I had no idea that the bolt handle being really tight after each round was a BIG warning then the last round cracked the extractor lip right off the bolt.
Posted by: CPTTango

Re: help new reloaders - 05/20/07 08:01 PM

Read read read read read and read some more. I must have read 20 or 30 reloading manuals and articles in magazines. Before I really started reloading.
Posted by: WIshrpshooter

Re: help new reloaders - 05/24/07 11:02 PM

Single reloader or multiple stage reloader?
Posted by: CPTTango

Re: help new reloaders - 06/03/07 12:46 AM

For some one just starting out I would say go with a good single stage like a RCBS Rockchucker. If you are not sure your going to keep reloading start with a Lee.

I reload on my OLD as dirt RCBS Reloader Special. It turns out great reloads today.

Many will tell you to start with a dilon RL550B. But there is a lot going on when you pull the handle of one of them. This is just me a progressive is not for a newbie. Start slow and get all the little details down pat before moving on. I reload because it is relaxing. I am not trying to crank out 10,000 rounds in an hour. I am not saying you can't start on a progressive. You know yourself better than I do. I am like Winchester from MASH, "I do one thing I do it very well, then I move one."
Posted by: kshuntercb

Re: help new reloaders - 06/25/07 12:19 PM

Any thoughts on the best way to load primers? My fairly new RCBS Rock Chucker has primer load function on the press. I notice the new ones have removed it and added the hand primer. What way is the safest and most preferred way to prime?
Posted by: Jack Roberts

Re: help new reloaders - 06/25/07 10:46 PM

The Lee hand primer is hard to beat. It has good feel, is cheap, and if you keep it greased will last forever.

Jack
Posted by: PlainsRedneckOK

Re: help new reloaders - 06/26/07 12:41 PM

I know nothing about reloading, but one phrase seems to apply to everything I do know about. That phrase is: Quality over Quantity. Quality is safety, accurate loads, and consistent loads. Quantity is not being safe, in a hurry, pushing the limit of your loads, and going for velocity. I'm not saying a high velocity is bad, but it only makes sense to me for your load to be accurate first and fast second. If I am wrong please somebody correct me, but I have a feeling that I am at least close to right.
Posted by: Night_Hawk

Re: help new reloaders - 07/05/07 01:35 PM

Lots of good information here.Seems that most everything was covered.
I started handloading in the late 70's for my 243 using a Lee handloader (still have it)and now use a rockchucker press and somtimes a Dillon progressive press.
Over the years i have got myself into trouble a couple of times with two instances that stand out a come to memory often.
1st time was when i bought my son a BLR 243.The loads that i had been shooting in my 243 had always proved to be on the mild side and thinking that they would be fine in his. Wrong for sure.First shot blew a primer resulting in gas burn to face and eyes. I am glad that it was me and not him.Moral of story do not exchange handloads between guns.

2nd time was this last spring i was reloading some 223 amo for my REM 700P. I had just finished loading some 223 for my CZFS that will easilly take 4 to 5grains more Varget and H335 than the remington.I had bought a eletronic scale and weighing each load i had a senior moment and overloaded the ammo for the Remington. Result was a frozen bolt.Had i been using my balance scale set for the proper charge this would not have happen.The eletronic scale are great just be take care not forget what your doing.

NH
Posted by: Aznative

Re: help new reloaders - 07/19/07 09:14 PM

Some ramblings about mistakes and things I've made/learned over the years.

When I was a young family man, I needed money more than nice factory bullets. Making lead bullets is definately for the budget consious. Well out here in hot as hell Phoenix Az, you better not store the bullets pointing up in your truck with all that wax lube on a lead bullet. The wax melted, and ran down into the powder. A squid load was the result. The sympton was a bullet stuck in my barrel.

I'm a little more flush today, and I have about five loading manuals plus the small factory loading manuals. Plus, I use the loading data base that Hogdon, Imr, and Winchester have online: http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp
I'm always looking at all the information I can find.


Today I have three electronic scales and one manual scale. This has caused some problems for me. Evan good scales will vary +- .2 grains. Sometimes this will cause a load to change or not work. One scale is a little high and the other is a little lower and wala you have a .4 gn variation.
I've invested into calibration weights. Sometimes it isn't good to have to much money. I've invested into calibration weights

As a general rule I've found extruded powders to be more tolerant of temp variation than ball powders. However, I've personally blew the primers out of some 308 loads shooting on a 117 degree day using an extruded powder the manufacturer claims to be temperature tolerant. If I'm working up loads in the summertime for hunting season, I'll keep my bullets stored in a cooler. I've been laughed at for this but it works. I don't do this if I want to test bullets under hot conditions.

Out here a car can get to 140 degrees in the cabin area with the windows closed. I use to keep some defensive ammo and a loaded gun in the cabin of a car. I still do, but I cycle it through every year. I've had ammo go bad after several summers. You would hear the hammer hit and a second later the gun would go bang.

Also as a general rule, I've found ball powders to be more load sensitive than extruded powders. In other words, a .5 powder charge change with ball powders can cause my groups size to change quickly and with greater size variation.

Beware of droppping extruded powders into anything smaller than 25/06 on a progressive. I have a 650 Dillon, and I have had H4831SC hang up in the powder bar because it clogged on the neck of a 243. It drops fine into a 2506. I've succesfully dropped varget into 223 with some reworking of my procedures on the 650. Never drop lincoln log IMR powders through a progressive. Just beware of this.

I have good very good lighting above my loading bench so my old eyes can actually look into the case and see the powder level when applicapble; plus, the 650 has a powder check system I use when I cannot physically see the powder level.

Many times I still charge all cases in a single step and will look down into the cases looking for a light or heavy load.

Beware of multi reloaded brass on semi's. Semi's tend to pull the brass apart internally just above the web. I've seen this happen after three shots on Federal brass in an M1A. As far as civilian brass, Federal wears out the quickest and they all will do this within 5 loadings. Military brass run through a machine gun is absolute worst for doing this. If you don't know what I'm talking about, find someone who shoots DCM High Power matches and have him show you.

I've seen it mentioned to only keep one type of powder on the bench. This also needs to be the rule with bullets. Don't shove a 180 gn bullet on a 110 gn powder charge. Also don't put a pistol or magnum primer on a charge designed for std rifle loads. Only keep one type of primer on the loading bench.

I rarely use magnum primers except on very large cases with ball powders. However, I'm about to start loading a 375 H&H. I'll be looking to see what they say in my loading manuals.

A good baseline is to shoot factory ammo through a chronograph. If your loads exceed the factory FPS, STOP SHOOTING.

A chronograph is a great tool. Buy one and get to know how to use it. I did.

If you cannot get a gun to shoot. Shoot match grade sierra. If they shoot good it isn't the gun. If you still cannot fing a load to shoot well, send the gun to a competent gunsmith. Check the sight mounts first, scope second, bedding third, etc, etc.

I started reloading for the savings. Today, I reload for the accuarcy.

I've been rambing like Carl Jung so I'll call it quits.

Aznative
Posted by: Onionskin

Re: help new reloaders - 08/19/07 02:15 PM

Lee makes two very good tools, one being the hand primer everyone swears by, and the other, the Auto Prime II, which works on top of your press.

Nice thing about the press one, it uses your normal shell holders, so you don't have to buy those extra. Also, if you have something that primes a bit hard, like military .223's that may not have the crimp removed too well, the II will do them fine. Finally, with the leverage you have on the press, you aren't forcing anything, and can feel the primer seat to the bottom of the pocket easily. Kind of like having a bigger hammer, and just tapping...
Posted by: Onionskin

Re: help new reloaders - 08/19/07 02:23 PM

Single stage is perfect for rifle work. However, should you be doing a lot of pistol shooting, that is where the progressives shine. I know guys who load on their 550 Dillons, for rifle, but they are skipping things they shouldn't: trimming, and cleaning primer pockets.

Of course you can remove cases at any station on a progressive, to do the things you should, but then why have a progessive?
Posted by: Mavrick10_2000

Re: help new reloaders - 08/28/07 11:20 AM

Quote:

Any thoughts on the best way to load primers? My fairly new RCBS Rock Chucker has primer load function on the press. I notice the new ones have removed it and added the hand primer. What way is the safest and most preferred way to prime?




Use a hand priming tool like the Lee or RCBS. In my experience you get a better feel for the primer seating with a smaller hand tool than the one mounted on a press like the Rockchuker. I have a rockchuker and I didn't like the way I had to prime with the little primer adapter thing after three loads. I personally use the RCBS APS hand loader which requires an APS loader tool which is convenient and extra strips if you load for different calibers. If you don't have the extra money the LEE will serve you well.

Another key to feel is that I can feel when the primer pockets are loosening and discard the brass before it becomes a problem or label 1-3 pieces for dummy round use with a sharpie on the case and put it in my dummy load brass container. When I discard brass I crush the neck and body with pliers so no one should mistake trying to reuse it and put it in my bucket to someday take to recycle to get more funds for more reloading supplies.

Which brings up another point, create dummy rounds to work on your bullet seating and label them carefully and obviously. It can save working and possibly marring other good pieces of brass trying to get things seated properly.

To do this you'll need a bullet puller, which is a tool you should have on the bench as well. If you have ever worked up a load and it starts to show pressure signs before you reach your next loads with a higher grain powder increment you need to disassemble the higher charged loads and start assembling those cartridges over at a lower/SAFER powder charge.
Posted by: Onionskin

Re: help new reloaders - 09/01/07 10:09 PM

None of the various presses did a decent job of priming, IMHO. If you study the results of most of them, the primers aren't even seated squarely. One fellow who was kind of meticulous, insisted on priming with his press, and I quizzed him about why he insisted on using an inferior method; turns out, he would rotate the case, and seat it 3 times...effectively reducing the errors in the system. But, why? Though I'm no fan of most Lee products, their Auto Prime II is the best priming system I've tried. Its fast, has good feel, and seats the primers perfectly square.
Posted by: coyote_grimreaper

Re: help new reloaders - 09/30/07 12:03 AM

Start low and work up when tryin loads in your rifle, like Sam said, just because the load is near max it may not shoot worth a darn in your rifle. As for other hints, ask as many reloaders as you can the same question and you will get that many different answers. Then form your own opinion.
Posted by: SkinWalker67

Re: help new reloaders - 09/30/07 08:14 PM

Remember 2 different powders and 3 different bullets make 6 combinations... multiplied by how much powder you charge will give you hundreds of combinations. #1 Find a bullet that you like in the weight that you like. Then build a load to support it. Twist rates within you rifle can dictate the weight of the bullet. Fast twist rates 1:7 to 1:9 will generally like heavier bullets. Subsequently, the 1:9 to 1:11+ will like the lighter bullets. Wear glasses. TOSS the catridges where the primer feeds very easy. Don't over fill cartridge with powder.
Posted by: oldmuleskinner

Re: help new reloaders - 11/08/07 02:45 AM

Don't get tempted into loading some "light loads" for plinking at lower velocities.

Most rifle powders are designed to be loaded to where the case is relatively full. Reduced loads can cause a dangerous increase in pressure called detonation. It is most common in larger capacity cases using slow burning powders. An possible example of a reduced load that could be dangerous would be going from a 26 grain load in the .223 case, down to 10 or 15 grains. The theory behind what causes detonation is that the powder of a greatly reduced load can lay along the bottom of the case (lengthwise) when the rifle is fired from a horizontal position. Instead of the primer igniting the powder charge at one end of the case and then burning progressively through the charge (as it would in a fully loaded case), the primer ignition can flash over the exposed surface of the powder - igniting it all at once - resulting in detonation and sometimes disasterously high chamber pressures.

I have a good friend who was always a very serious and careful reloader. He lost his sight in one eye when a case separated in his .243 Sako while shooting reduced loads. He had previously shot many rounds of the same load with no problems.

There are suitable powders for shooting reduced loads - just be sure that you are following some reliable loading data.

Be safe and have a great day!!!
Posted by: GR5150

Re: help new reloaders - 11/24/07 11:18 PM

In my reloading experience case prep makes a huge difference in accuracy, primer pocket prep, trim length and weigh and match the cases to get a good lot. DO NOT mix different brands of brass! I like to also rotate the case 180 deg after seating the bullet and reseat it again, I think it helps to make the round more concentric ... leading to better accuracy. I prefer the Lee priming tool, I seem to get a better and more consistent feel seating primers and like the RCBS pardner press for the same reason.

Hope this helps. Gary
Posted by: SodakJim

Re: help new reloaders - 12/04/07 04:26 AM

If all the dos and don'ts haven't convinced you to give up the idea of reloading your own ammo, your ready to begin a fun hobby. This is where safety and attention to detail is critical to your success and continued good looks. The Gurus in these pages are giving you the benefit of many years of experience, but sometimes important things get lost in the translation and terms. If something doesn't seem right, check it out before pulling the trigger.

One final point: Think twice about about loading ammo for other people. I will do it sometimes for immediate family when I have developed the load for a specific gun. Even a good friend that thinks he was injured by a load you were good enough to provide, could take you to the cleaners in court.
Posted by: chris112

Re: help new reloaders - 12/06/07 01:44 PM

When buying manual's get one from your favorite bullet maker, another from your favorite powder maker and one from an equipment maker. The combination should cover most of what you need. And double check the loads against each other.
Double check which powder a load calls for. There are several that use duplicate numbers (not the letter with them) but the data is definately different. There is a rifle at a local store that was blown up because of this.
Posted by: ackleyman

Re: help new reloaders - 12/07/07 06:14 PM

I am sure that by now that you are totally confused. I have been shooting/reloading since 1968 and shot my first benchrest match in 1969. I have really enjoyted the sport of reloading for accuracy.

When a new guy starts out, it is tough because we all want it all right now.

This is the time to set some priorities, and you have to ask yourself what is important.

To help out the new guy that wants to start reloading, there are some items that are paramount that you buy CLOSE to first quality first time around, and other items that will do more than an acceptable job for a long time to come that may be considered second quality(but they are not).

You can get by with a Lee press, but a Rock chucker from RCBS is one of the very best investments that you will ever make.

Forester/Bonanza Benchrest dies are fantastic money spent first time around, they go a long way in getting the bullet started straight.

An RCBS 10-10 Scale is one of the very best tripple beams ever built, and a RCBS 505 is second.

I have a $800 electronic scale that verifies the accuracy of both of these two scales and they are dead nuts.

I have a private rifle range that I shoot at, with a complete 3 sets of reloading equipment for me and my shooting partner.

Please send any questions to:

keithcandler@msn.com

Ackleyman
Posted by: rks1949

Re: help new reloaders - 12/08/07 07:53 AM

Be sure to trim those cases! Most get a little lazy,and try to skip this step. A long case neck will cause high pressures in a otherwise safe load. You will find that speed is not the "king,"of shooting. Accuracy is more important. Most loads shoot their best at a 90% fill rate. It is very rare,that a max load delivers the best accuracy. A slow Hit,will beat a Fast miss,any day! Ron
Posted by: NickR

Re: help new reloaders - 12/11/07 07:34 AM

Lots of great advice here. I hadn't really thought about the vacuum before, but will use a broom from now on. Here's my own cautionary tale that I haven't seen here yet. I had a beautiful new Cooper in .257 AI. One day I pulled the trigger on what I thought was a normal load. Click, no bang, empty casing when I opened the bolt, so I put a light down the barrel and the bullet was jammed just ahead of the chamber. As near as I can figure, I missed putting powder in that one and the primer drove it into the barrel. Despite what I read on the web, that bullet would not come out, even after I bent a brass rod with a hammer to drive it back. I ended up sending it to Cooper who did their usual class act thing and rebarrelled the gun for free. Lesson learned - Now I weigh each finished loaded round of every batch. If it's more than a grain off, it gets recycled. Like the carpenter says "Measure twice, cut once. This routine also will catch double charges (from being distracted while loading) and is much more reliable than a flashlight. You do need a good electronic scale, not cheap, but I can check 50 rounds in a very few minutes and I then feel much better.
Posted by: ackleyman

Re: help new reloaders - 12/12/07 07:27 PM

The biggest thing that will help new reloaders is to learn to humble themselves and ask questions...no such thing is a dumb question. A great reloading manual is the Nosler Manual, Hornady reloading manual, and the Sierra Reloading manual. Every new reloader should invest in all three if at all possible.

If/when questions arise, come to this board and ask for help...we all had some precious person take us under their wing and help us learn. Sometimes the internet is a faceless non-personal place to be, but there are some very special people on this board that devote themselves to serving others.
Posted by: wendle

Re: help new reloaders - 12/15/07 12:01 PM

I am VERY new at reloading and would like to know about using Red Dot powder for reloading .204 with Winchester primers and a 40 gr v-max Hornady bullet.
Also am planning to reload 22-250.
Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.
Dumb as a rock.
Posted by: RTLOF18918B

Re: help new reloaders - 12/16/07 10:34 PM

Quote:

i have notice there seems to be a lot of new guys that have started reloading.i think we should let these guys know a few things to keep them safe.here are a few things that i have come up with. 1. always wear eye protection. 2.for you guys that are loading thier on pills right now during the cold months beware with some powders these loads are fine during the winter and cold months but during the hot months they can blow up in your face.i have seen this happen at our local gun range.thank the lord nobody got hurt.i mean there was chunks of the gun missing that could not be found.if you are pushing max loads during the winter do not shoot these during the summer.work some more loads up and pay close attention to the pressure signs.my self if i am using powders that are not extream powders (BL-C2) i try to find a load in the middle so i can use it year round.even at that you will not believe how these loads can change during the summer months.i work up most of my loads during the cold months because it dosent take long for barrell to cool.i am sure there will be a lot added to this but this is a good start.one of my fav sayings.a young man that rolls his own bullets wont be rolling nothing else.i have raised 3 boys and one nephew that proves this right.




Hail to all who have replied to this post. All is good, solid info and worthy of respect. Pay attention to all of it. One thing I have not seen mentioned yet is rate of twist in the barrel. 1 in 12 vs 1 in 9 etc. This will also affect accuracy and pressure. Pay attention to this in the manual vs your rifle. If yours is different than that listed back off on the charge a little. Also if you are loading a Speer bulett use only Speer data not Sierra or Nosler. If you must use another manufacturers data, back off the powder charge by 10% and work up.

Of all of the loads I've worked up for my rifles, the best ones seem to be in the middle of the specs. But those are JUST my rifles. As someone mentioned, Atmospheric temperature has a lot to do with pressure. What max load shoots ok in the winter when it's cold may be way over pressure in the summer. Also be careful of magnum primers in this situation. A mag primer while elk hunting in Montanta in the winter time at 20 degrees may be way to much for Nevada or Arizona in the summer time. If you have any questions about any of this conact someone on the forum or a reputable gun shop. Remember, As said before, what shoot great in one rifle may not shoot well in an identical rifle. Firearms are as different as people are.

Just my 2 cents worth.

RTLOF(TONY)
Posted by: Mike2

Re: help new reloaders - 12/27/07 10:30 PM

Here is a link to a neat recoil chart that's worth looking at
http://www.chuckhawks.com/recoil_table.htm
Mike
Posted by: Big10gauge

Re: help new reloaders - 12/30/07 01:18 AM

Also if you change the brand of your brass or primers work up the load from the bottom again, Big difference from Rem to WW cases also the rem primer is not as hot as CCI,WW or Fed.
Posted by: Safecracker

Re: help new reloaders - 12/31/07 10:43 AM

I started reloading in 1966 when I was 16. Primarely because I could load cheaper that I could buy. I loaded for a .22 Hornet and a K98 Mouser. I never did it for the accuracy potential, only the cost difference. Anyway, the first time I made a mistake, and yes, there have beem more than one but this was the most costly. 1st. mistake. I missed a shell while dropping powder. 2nd mistake. Didn't hear the pop when the primer went off, and thought it was a dud round. 3rd. mistake. Fired another round without checking the bore, and darn near blew the barrel off my Ruger Blackhawk. The barrel swelled and looked like something from a cartoon. The strength of a Blackhawk is unbelievable! There were deffinatly two puffs of dust when the bullets hit the ground in front of the target. After that, I always double and tripple check my cases before seating any bullets.
My point is, do everything you can to elimenate any and all distractions while reloading. You may be saving your life, and the guys next to you at the fireing range.
John
Posted by: roaddog

Re: new reloaders - 12/31/07 09:11 PM

Speaking of mistakes.....Many years ago I was reloading 30-06 rounds. My rancher pal and I had a few beers and decided to throw together some bullets. I thought I had checked all of the cases to be sure they were charged with powder before seating the bullets. A couple of days later I ws hunting on his ranch and saw a buck about 75 yards away. I fired and missed (the loads were not that great) and the deer ran up the side of the hill. I chambered another round and fired...but it only went "click". When I tried to chamber a third round it wouldn't load. I decided something was very wrong. Apparently I had not loaded powder in the case. When I fired the second round, the click I heard the primer, which forced the bullet just into the lands and prevented the third round from chambering. If the bullet had traveled even and inch into the barrel and the third round was fired, the gun would have certainly blown up. I was very lucky that day. Since then I do not mix alcohol with reloading, although the mistake could have been made anyway. Be sure to check, then double check, every step in the process.
Posted by: cngerms

Re: new reloaders - 01/11/08 02:21 PM

Do any of you use software of any kind to assist you in the reloading process? I see Sierra offers such a product and I'm wondering if any of you have experience with their product or one similar, please? Thanks!
Posted by: coyote_grimreaper

Re: help new reloaders - 01/12/08 06:00 PM

I personally have never had a max load shoot worth a crap in my rifles. Most often I am between the published minimum and maximum. Usually closer to min than max. Like most others have already stated, start low and work up. Most likely you will find a load that shoots well long before you reach the other end. Good luck and stau safe.
Posted by: TOFER76

Re: help new reloaders - 01/14/08 06:47 PM

CAN ANYONE GET SOME PICS OF THIER RELOADING SET UPS PLEASE
Posted by: Mountainworm

Re: help new reloaders - 01/23/08 07:39 AM

Keep a log or notebook of details,(dates,cases,primers,powders,weights and lengths,etc.). Sounds "blah-blah-blah" but sooner or later you can, or will have to look back to see the info on what you loaded.
Posted by: pasturepup

Re: help new reloaders - 01/23/08 10:09 PM

Would you be able to go to the rifle manufacture of your rifle/pistol and get good reloading books from them?
Posted by: NHnewbie

Re: help new reloaders - 01/29/08 09:21 PM

I just started reloading and im reading the manuals, using starting loads and I've been having some loads actually break open the action of my gun( i have a single shot rossi in.223) Why is this?
Posted by: tgrif

Re: help new reloaders - 02/09/08 05:41 PM

How cost effective is reloading versus "bulk" reloaded ammo-i.e. Georgia Arms ammo. This ammo would be used for trigger time ammo.
I don't reload at present so I would have to buy a complete set-up.


Never mind guys. I found the cost calculator at Handloads.com
Posted by: halfmile

Re: help new reloaders - 02/17/08 07:23 PM

Be aware of bullet seating depth. many of the forum topics refer to seating the bullet into the lads or just off.

This is fine if yuou approach it gradually, but a high pressure situation is inevitable with such technique.

The best thing you can do is know your chamber and don't push it. A load which works well at SAAMI dimentsions can be very redline or worse when jammed into the lands.

HM
Posted by: Helipilotm

Re: help new reloaders - 04/01/08 12:50 AM

Quote:

CAN ANYONE GET SOME PICS OF THIER RELOADING SET UPS PLEASE



Here is mine right after I finished. I dont have any newer pictures. Hope it helps
Posted by: Stealth1959

Re: help new reloaders - 04/02/08 01:31 PM

This board has been a Godsend for me and my first attempt at reloading metalic cartriges. Thanks to all.
Posted by: dakotahowler

Re: help new reloaders - 04/08/08 01:46 AM

I neck size my cases for my .223 700 rem. but that don't mean they will work in another gun. every schamber is different as well as head space. another thing that I live by is never load ammo for someone anything is possible and you don't want to be responsible for it. if someone wants you to load there have them help and teach them to do it them selves
Posted by: wolfish

Re: help new reloaders - 04/17/08 09:05 AM

Thank you guys for all the great input! I haven't started reloading yet, but I plan to very soon. I will bookmark this thread for the future.
Posted by: ARCOREY

Re: help new reloaders - 05/01/08 01:05 PM

I keep a box of small ziploc bags and a black sharpie on my bench. When I don't have enough ammo boxes for my different loads, I bag and tag. When I have once fired brass coming out of the tumbler, I bag and tag. When I have different caliber brass or even different manufacturers of the same caliber, I bag and tag. When I have odd bullets lying around or lose the boxes to them, I bag and tag. For my assortments of RCBS accessories that fit the same handle like case neck brushes, primer pocket brushes and small parts, I bag and tag. A couple bucks worth of bags and sharpies go a long ways. Especially in small spaces .
Posted by: Passthru

Re: help new reloaders - 05/07/08 02:56 AM

Quote:

I keep a box of small ziploc bags and a black sharpie on my bench. When I don't have enough ammo boxes for my different loads, I bag and tag. When I have once fired brass coming out of the tumbler, I bag and tag. When I have different caliber brass or even different manufacturers of the same caliber, I bag and tag. When I have odd bullets lying around or lose the boxes to them, I bag and tag. For my assortments of RCBS accessories that fit the same handle like case neck brushes, primer pocket brushes and small parts, I bag and tag. A couple bucks worth of bags and sharpies go a long ways. Especially in small spaces .




Ahhh, here is one, Plastic, Do not ever store Primers loose or in thier box in plastic bags or plastic wrap..Plastic can produce static. dont know if its a valid point, but it occured to me...Wax paper would be better.
Posted by: dog1whckr

Re: help new reloaders - 06/03/08 03:06 AM

The ONE trap I fell into reloading my 22-250 stuff was complacancy!!! I used Varget at 34.5 grains on 55 GR V-MAX through two bottles of powder with extremely good success. 240 yard shots on p-dogs - no problem out of my box gun. Came time for more powder and I just went ahead and loaded at 34.5 grains. I noticed the gun shot hot and high (3 inches) at 200 yards. During sight in after 9 rounds I suffered case separation at the base and stuck shell plus primer expulsion. This happened twice on the same number round fired. On examination there was SOME indication of high pressure on the primer!! Long story short I loaded at 31.0 GR of Varget(minimum load) and still had high pressure signs on the primer. On top of that I had to have the ejector pin and spring drilled out and replaced in the bolt. The brass clip in the bolt face that holds the base is also damaged. Not good!!! The same problems occurred with two new bottles of powder. I now load using IMR4064, 33.5 GR, and 50 GR V-MAX. Everything is excellent once again for accuracy with no signs of high pressure. One CANNOT be to careful exercising safety first rules. I cannot over state that fact. 500 rounds and who would have thought........................................
apparently I didn't..
Posted by: Mavrick

Re: help new reloaders - 06/19/08 05:00 PM

I'm one of those weird guys that started reloading so I could shoot more, instead I found a new sport. I now shoot so I can reload! Any excuse to shoot.
I use a chronograph, an Oehler M33, so I can see changes faster. If there is a sudden or unexpected change in velocity, I know there is at least twice as much, percentage-wise, change in pressure. I don't know the pressure, but I know there has been a change, it never goes down, when I use more powder.
The consensus is to do things consistantly. The actual things each reloader does may be different, and their tools may be different, but the do it EVERY time. If something you do turns out to have a problem, change it. That's why, after reading the manual(s), you go slowly. You can always speed up later, as your muscle-memory becomes more inplace.
Our needs are different. I shoot several guns, of several types, ie rapid pistol, target-shooting and bench-rest, varmint-class, as extremes, but also, for instance, trap-shooting. You would have other needs, therefor, would do things slightly different. Just don't rush things.
Have fun,
Gene
Posted by: Mavrick

Re: help new reloaders - 06/19/08 05:12 PM

Several guys have mentioned records. Whatever system you use, maximize the information on the load, then firure a retrieval system, too. I use a Sharpie, or Marks a Lot on my bench to mark the case on the side. It comes off in the tumble-media.
Have fun,
Gene
Posted by: ackleyman

Re: help new reloaders - 08/09/08 11:29 AM

One of my main manuals that I really trust is the Nosler Manual. Their accuracy loads have proven to be a winner in many rifles of mine over the years. Nosler bullets have also proved to be very close if not as accurate as the Match bullets that I made for many years shooting Benchrest competition.

When it comes to reloading, one thing that it leads to is more shooting.

One of the largest mistakes that most shooters make is not cleaning their guns on a regular basis. One little bit of information that most shooters are not aware of is just how fast a cleaning brush will wear out. I have been using the bronze bristle brushes from www.sinclairintl.com for many years and have never scratched my preicious custom barrels with them. Never, Never, Never use a stainless steel brush, they will scratch barrels.

The best cleaning solvents that I use are Montana Extreme solvent and Montana Extreme 50 BMG copper solvent which are both OIL based. Pushing 4 soaking wet patches of the regular Montana Extreme through the bore and leaving it over night will remove most fouling with one application of the Montana Extreme 50 BMG copper solvent getting the rest out withing 15 minute soak. I use the brushes when I have stubborn barrels and/or need to clean in a hurry.

A good rod guide is necessary if you do not want to lap your throat egg shaped over the years. There are two companies that make good rod guides that perfectly center the rod in the bore at this time, Neil Jones ( 814-763-2769 in Pa.) and Lucas. Rod guides never wear out, and are a great investment in your equipment, costing $35 or so.

Bullet seating depth is critical to maximizing the accuracy of your rifle, it is as important as your powder charge.
There are two tools that you need to measure your seating depth properly, a Over All Length gage made by Rajun Cajun who is a moderator on this board. Rajun Cajun's tool is very easy to use and accurate, and at $25 is a steal. Another tool that you will need to use in conjunction with Rajun's tool is a Ogive gage sold by www.sinclairintl.com called a Davidson ogive gage which will enable you to measue the seating depth off the ogive of the bullet instead of the point. Using these two divices, you will be able to measure the seating depth down to the .001.

Good luck in your new hobby!
Posted by: UncleDoc

Re: help new reloaders - 09/01/08 08:20 PM

There is also an abundance of reloading data out there from sources such as Alliant Powders, Winchester and Hodgdon. It is published from the powder manufacturer's perspective. Good info, especially when compared to the data the bullet manufacturers provide in the manuals. I second the post that velocity is secondary. If you can't hit 'em, it don't matter how fast it shoots.
Posted by: Evil_Lurker

Re: help new reloaders - 09/13/08 03:06 AM

I'd agree that if you insist on developing loads that are at the extreme of what the cartridge can handle, you will eventually regret it.
A "good" load, in my opinion, doesn't show pressure signs like flattened primers or heavy extraction forces and the powder fills the case very close to the bullet base or even a slight compression. The less "air space" in the case, the better. I've had my best accuracy with loads that are just short of being compressed (case full to bottom of neck).
You'll probably have to use the powder burn chart and some experimentation to find the best powder/bullet combination for your rifle, and a chrono is a worthwhile investment.
Posted by: stiff neck

Re: help new reloaders - 09/25/08 02:50 PM

Every one of the blunders and accidents posted above could have been avoided by following the basic rules that are printed in any reloading manual. Don't drink while loading, don't have distractions in the background, always start low and work up loads, don't use your reloads in a rifle they were not worked up for, don't load hot or weak loads, if you change ANY component you must start your testing over working low to high, pay attention and double check everything before you cut/pour/seat/load, etc. All the safety rules are right there in the manual, and most of them are just plain common sense. People who take shortcuts are asking for trouble.
Posted by: Varmonter

Re: help new reloaders - 10/29/08 04:08 AM

Iv'e been reloading most of my adult life.
I have seldom used or even tried max loads and when i did i usually ended up well below them as my go to round.
I have seldom seen max loads be the most accurate.
So usually i find a happy medium between min and max that gives me the best pattern.My .204 Ruger i load to about 3800
fps well below the max of around 4200.This yields me superior
accuracy and still enough umph to whack anything around these hills..I don't burn up the barrel at the range or busy hunts.
so the gun is more pleasant to shoot(not that the 204 kimber is a hard kick.) saves a few grains of powder and is the most accurate load in that rifle. .210 in 3 shot group is my best to date.
Posted by: REALTREE

Re: help new reloaders - 11/10/08 08:41 PM

i agree test yourself starting low listen to stiff neck its great advice
Posted by: win22250

Re: help new reloaders - 11/30/08 07:24 PM

Geez Luize it sure is tough to add anything to whats already been said here. About all I can add is related to military brass. Military brass is typically thicker than commercial brass so your internal case capacity will be SMALLER with the military brass. Keep that in mind when charging with powder. Smaller internal case capacity INCREASES case pressure, all other variables being the same.
Myself like a lot here that roll their own, have had the same experience that max loads never seem to be the most accurate loads. I stick to middle of the road, then experiment with bullet styles, bullet weight,powder types, etc.
Posted by: schepherd

Re: help new reloaders - 12/02/08 01:17 PM

dont trust that what you think your buying is what your getting, I just bought some magnum primers from walmart, got home opened them up and found it was missing several,then I lookaed closer and found small rifle primers mixed in the box! so who knows if the others are what they are supposed to be. funny how they lock up items such as car stereos but their primers and powders are left out in the open to be tampered with
Posted by: ksjack

Re: help new reloaders - 12/08/08 01:47 AM

I have been reloading for a couple of months and have been using the COL listed in my manuals for seating the bullet depths. I bought a Nosler reloading manual because I want to try the CT Ballistic Silvertip and their manual doesn't show the COL used on their bullets. Instead it has a section for determining the proper seating depth. I found that if I use this method it makes my overall length quite a bit longer than what is listed in the other manuals. Staying on the side of caution, I wanted to see if anyone here uses this method and could give me some input.
Posted by: sweets33

Re: help new reloaders - 12/11/08 05:18 AM

Boy Im glad for a sight like this. Some many question and only ten finger two eyes two ears one nose and only life...I need al the help i can get..
Posted by: sav10LE_308

Re: help new reloaders - 12/22/08 10:28 AM

I'll throw in a few thoughts.

Sort your brass first. If using different kinds be aware the have different internal volumes. Different kinds of brass will may equal different loads. at a minimum I try to keep them in batches by kind (manufacture), and how many times fired.

also I've heard of folks wanting to shine their pretty new rounds when their all done by tumbling them. NOT RECOMENDED. the tumbling will break the powder down to basically flash powder. tumble them too long and they can become very dangerous.
Posted by: foxxpro

Re: help new reloaders - 01/05/09 11:26 PM

The best way I have found to keep my brass sorted is get some plastic boxes or small buckets and number them, each time you shoot them put them in the box with the number of times they have been fired so you can keep track. You can get small boxes and stack them if you dont have much room. All of mine fit on the top shelf of my reloading bench.
Posted by: gobblr addict

Re: help new reloaders - 01/11/09 04:00 PM

I have been reloading for 20yrs. I have a Pacific/Hornady single stage.

I too have never seen maximum velocity= accuracy. I bought 2-.204's when they came out. Never got speeds like Hornady and Ruger professed without seeing high pressure signs. My most accurate loads come from moderate velocities, 300-400fps slower than people say they were getting.

Having 2 .204's, both Remingtons, I figured I'd try some loads from my Rem.7 just to shoot in my new XR-100. Wrong. The chambers were completely different, so much so, I could not even close the bolt on my XR-100....

You'd think two like calibers from the same manufacturer would at least be interchangeable....WRONG! And many people do this by shooting a friends reloads. Never do this....

To keep these same .204's separate, I use brass and primers for one gun, and different brass and primers for the other. Remington primer-gold, Federal primers-silver. Any method to keep from getting cases and loads mixed is worthwhile.

I owe all my gun's accuracy to my pickyness in reloading. I weigh each load, never just use lever powder measures. And I mic each case after resizing either neck size or full length, everytime. A micrometer is a must, and I too, have no less than 4 reloading manuals to use as a cross-reference.

Getting loads offa forum like this for new reloaders is fine, but look at manuals scrutinizing the info you get from these forums. People on here are for the most part veteran shooters and reloaders, and give good info on loads. Just always verify and drop back 5 grains first. Look for pressure signs closely. It'll be well worth your time to use load data from here, just do not start with the exact load, as your gun may not handle the load....gobblr addict
Posted by: pdhunter

Re: help new reloaders - 01/29/09 06:52 AM

Maybe some said this and I missed but I will say it again.
Like your mother would say " clean your room ".
Clutter , spilled powder, loose brass & bullets , ect.
can and will cause real problems.
Also have only 1 can of powder on the bench at at a time
as well as 1 type of primers.
Enjoy this great hobby , but do it safly
Posted by: griffon

Re: new reloaders - 02/05/09 01:24 AM

Quote:

A lot of new reloaders tend to ignore the advice in the reloading books, you see their posts on various message boards where they have just started loading and went right to the maximum loads listed in the reloading books.

Reloading books list their loads in different ways, some only give the maximum loads and advise to start at 10% lower, and some others list a starting load and a max load, if there is a starting load, use it!

If there is only one load listed, start at 10% LESS, and as mentioned, don't go to max loads in cold weather, it might cause a problem when the weather gets hot.

One of the major things, get a good reloading book and read it!

Here's a good one and it's a new edition, so it's up to date: http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=438424




Some powders like Varget are very temperature stable, allowing one to use the same loads in any weather. I've been reloading for 40 years and have learned to apply the "KISS" principle. Use as few different powers, primers and other components as you can. Look at the manufacturer's data closely before choosing and find a good load and stick with it.
You don't need a lot of different powdwers around and certainly only have one (the one you are currently using) on the bench at a time.
Do not use the wrong primer.
Keep records of all loads
These are just a few tips that come to mind.
Posted by: rivetgun55

Re: help new reloaders - 02/08/09 04:15 PM

Once you figure out what you are doing !!! Always use the same sequence. Don't rearrange your steps. Early on I had to add an important step. While firing my H&K P9 45 auto one shot just sounded a bit different. I almost squeezed off another shot. Glad i didn't! checked pistol and had a bullet stuck in barrel. I missed charging one. I then added
the step of after charging a tray I physicaly look in each piece of brass to make sure I don't miss another. 25 years later Never have missed one. Good thing. I value my limbs!
Posted by: tgubler

Re: help new reloaders - 03/05/09 01:39 PM

can i reload ammo that will be like factory ammo that can shoot in any gun of that calibor. in other words reload ammo and use it like it was factory. is there any information that will give specs on factory loads other than balistics.
Posted by: Riccur

Re: help new reloaders - 03/05/09 02:06 PM

I have not seen it stated here and I am just starting out, but would it make sense to weigh your completed rounds and avoid any mistake in the charged uncharged scenario. Obviously you would need to know what a properly assembled cartridge weighs but seems like you could do this a tray at a time if you calculate the weight correctly the first time.
Posted by: BigBadJohn

Re: help new reloaders - 03/08/09 07:35 PM

I start at the starting load amount an i load four then i go up two gr then load four then go up two more an so on, then i shot them on a lead sled to find the best group then thats what i will load, an you need to keep the bullet lenght the same to...you need a clean,quite place so you can focus on the reloading so you dont get hurt an you can make better ammo...
Posted by: tgubler

Re: help new reloaders - 03/11/09 11:09 AM

will regular full length dies decap primers that have military crimp?
Posted by: mtbadger

Re: help new reloaders - 03/11/09 07:01 PM

I'm interested in the same question tgubler.
Posted by: reddog964

Re: help new reloaders - 03/11/09 07:07 PM

Just use them the same as any brass, they will work fine...
Posted by: tgubler

Re: help new reloaders - 04/01/09 03:09 PM

I am new to reloading. i have a new hornady electronic scale. it has measurements in g(grams i am guessing),
oz (ounces),
gn (grain i am guessing), kt (karat). Question is am weighting powder with "g" or "gn"?
Posted by: groundhogsniper

Re: help new reloaders - 04/26/09 08:50 PM

You are correct g = grams and gn = grains. Big difference. You want grains.
Posted by: NDHunter83

Re: help new reloaders - 05/05/09 07:35 PM

I just recently became a member of PM and i have to give it to you guys this website is GREAT! I've been reloading for close to 2 years now and absolutly love it. Thanks for all your great advice! Keep up the good work.
Posted by: 2buckchuck

Re: help new reloaders - 06/17/09 09:39 PM

28 yrs of reloading and made my 1st major mistake! Grabbed the Reloader 7 instead of the Reloader 15 [both similar black containers]. My reloading bench now has all powder containers arranged by burn rate rather than by manufacturer.
Posted by: ratslayer72

Re: help new reloaders - 08/03/09 10:01 AM

I started reloading in 1977 and have enjoyed every moment of it. It is a challenge and a science. I suppose almost everyone goes through the "power crazy" phase at some point but, I have discovered that if you varmint hunt consistency is what you are after. You want a tight group with consistent and repeatable data. Buy a good reloading manual and read ALL of the stuff BEFORE you get to the load data. Firearm safety starts at the bench!

When you are doing load development a simple rule will save you time and grief. Take an extra fine sharpie and write on the case the powder and charge, it will come off when you polish the brass. I learned this the hard way, I had all of my loads arranged in a range box in a certain way. On the way to the line I tripped and the box fell and opened scattering the contents. Now I got to pick them all up and go back to the house and pull every single bullet. Wasted time and effort. My granddad always told me "You gotta be smarter than what you are working with." Sound advice.
Posted by: ratslayer72

Re: help new reloaders - 08/03/09 10:05 AM

I have an overstock of 22-250 brass Remington NIB 1,000 count. I will sell it for $287.50 plus shipping.
Posted by: M1A1_Predator

Re: help new reloaders - 08/03/09 06:29 PM

hey guys im new to the site.. how can i post a pic of my gun on here? hope i can get other ppls gun pics too thanks
Posted by: BoomSplat

Re: help new reloaders - 08/22/09 10:30 AM

Hey , Jack, shouldn't "Help new Reloaders" be moved to the Reloader Forum along with the "Everything AR" thread to the AR Forum?

Boom
Posted by: Shynloco

Re: help new reloaders - 08/31/09 12:30 AM

Due to the high cost and availability of ammo, I've recently started reloading myself even though I've been shooting weapons for over 45 years. I've read various books and articles and bought the book, The ABC's of Reloading which I recommend all new reloaders read. The one thing I've noticed in terms of load recommendations by gunpowder manufactures, is their number of grains and the OAL sizing of casings is sometimes too high. Because of these discrepancies, I've come to cross reference load recommendations through two and three sources and go with the LOWER numbers simply because you can always increase the amount of power you go with or a shorter casing which won't create chambering problems. But I do enjoy reading ideas of folks who've been doing this stuff for years and learn alot from their experiences.
Posted by: Shynloco

Re: help new reloaders - 08/31/09 08:34 AM

Question for everybody....Being new to reloading, I like to verify any load and casing specs through various sources to make sure I'm not overloading in weight and size. I've noticed something in some reference material that there are specs for say "22-250" and then another "22-250 Improved" which show different spec on the casing size. What does "Improved" mean? Thx.
Posted by: youngdon

Re: help new reloaders - 08/31/09 08:45 AM

It means Ackley Improved, the shoulder is changed to enable the case to hold more powder. NEVER use improved data unless your firearm has an improved chamber.
Posted by: Shynloco

Re: help new reloaders - 08/31/09 07:44 PM

Thx for the info. I never do anything with firearms that I don't know what it means. Unfortunately I;ve seen some idiots who have and the end result ain't exactly pretty.
Posted by: SaberX01

Re: help new reloaders - 10/16/09 03:54 PM

There is allot of valuable info on the thread. I've printed it and will keep in my loading notes for sure. Here are a few thoughts I have on handloading.

When I went to boot camp, Many Many years of ago, they drilled one thing in our heads that that I remember like it was yesterday, "Just Becasue It's New, Doesn't Make It Clean". They were referring to our gear.

Ok, that's interesting, but how does that apply to hand-loading. Well, when I buy components, expecially brass and bullets, I assume nothing. I "measure everything", weights, dimensions, etc, and I record those values via lot numbers, especially for load development. I determine what the lot is, min / max / mean, and whether it's suitable for what i'm doing. I also weigh these rounds in many different stages during the loading process as a safety check. Especially duing primer seat and powder charge steps, then again after bullet seating.

Why is that important, safety primarily, but also consistent & accurate loads. How would that 40gr load work if by chance you got one 55gr bullet, and didn't check the weights? If your on the edge of your max pressure and velocities, could be a serious and possiblly fatel problem.

The other thing I've found invauable, is record keeping, both at the reloading bench and the range. That coupled with a solid reloading procedure can produce amazing reuslts that are safe. Each load / build is a procedure on it's own. Sure, there are mauny common steps, but each load has a unique process that should be followed.

Another thing I'm always careful about is component selection. Once I've built up a load combination, say on Norma or Remington Brass, If I don't have that brass available, I don't swap one for the other. Same for all the rest of the components. If I dont have what I built the load on, I don't load it until I have the right compnents.

The last one I'd like to strees is establishing a proper load development process and sticking too it. There are many models available for this, but you need to research each, understand there purpose & limitations as well as the safety aspects of each. Just because a manual calls out a min / max component combinaiton, don't assume it's safe for your particular weapon, as each weapon is like a finger print, they are all different and you should start low, then build up to what works best and most importantly, works safely. If you change any of the primary components, you must assume (from a safety stanpoint) that nothing has been verified to be safe, as you've not gone through your load development process with them.

For a few final thoughts, I find handloading as enjoyable as shooting itself, however, safety is the primary concern for me, as it is for "all" the major ammo MFG's. They spend millions on safety & load testing, and for a good reason, they want us to enjoy the product, but they want and need it to be safe. Assume nothing, validate everything, enjoy the hobby and most of all ...

"Be Safe"

Posted by: sgtcliff

Re: new reloaders - 10/16/09 10:36 PM

I think the best advice that I can lend that hasn't been said is, buy the best equipment you can afford--a good scale is a must have. Don't reload a bunch of cartridges, try making a few first and see if they are what you are looking for.
Posted by: S1NGL3SH0T

Re: new reloaders - 10/18/09 04:46 AM

Hi I'm thinking about getting started in reloading when I get back from Iraq in a couple months. I'm looking at the different reloading sets and notice a huge difference in the Lee and RCBS equipment as far as price is concerned. Currently I'm looking into the Lee Anniversary Reloading kit with the challenger press. Would this be adept for reloading? I'm not looking to reload large magnums the rifles that i would be reloading for are .223, .243 and .30-06. Would this kit fit my needs for a while? Also what books do you guys recomend for looking up loads. I've already ordered the ABC's of reloading just want to make sure I keep this as safe and accurate as possible.
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: new reloaders - 10/18/09 03:32 PM

There is nothing wrong with Lee Dies just cause they are cheaper (I shot a big whitetail doe at 400 yards with my 7x57 Mauser and 160 gr. Nosler Partition loaded with Lee dies.

Lee makes some very effective and cheap case prep tools e.g. case trimmers, Lee hand Priming tool is a must (under $20).

Buy a primer pocket uniformer from Sinclair International; works great with a battery-powered screwdriver adaptor which Sinclair also sells.

Buy an R.E. Wilson case mouth de-burring/chamfering hand tool ($10.00-15.00).

An RCBS 10-10 balance beam powder scale ($140.00 retail but look around for one at a discount or a package deal, auctions, etc. [most expensive of all critcal tools, but you need a great, reliable, accurate scale].

Another must is a good dial caliper for measuring case length/loaded cartridge length (good ones out there for $30.00 although I hate to admit they are made in China; a better Mitituyo from Japan will cost you $70 or $80-90 Starett from USA).

Good manuals are the Lyman (shows a lot of loads with many brands of bullets) , Nosler (they like testing w/ Nosler bullets only so if you wanna spend $ for Nosler bullets, that's OK...data can be judiciously i.e. carefully extrapolated to other bullet brands), Speer. And, Accurate, and ramshot powders have FREE manuals showing loads with their powders and various bullets [great powders for the .223/30-06/.243, by the way].

Spending $60-70 on several manuals and reading them should
be your FIRST thing. That muster-out Army pay is almost gone on this list, eh?

You're Welcome, and I salute your services overseas!!!
Posted by: Yotecallr

Re: new reloaders - 10/18/09 04:56 PM

Lee dies are excellent in spite of their low price.
Posted by: S1NGL3SH0T

Re: help new reloaders - 10/19/09 03:42 AM

Ok thank you for the prompt attention. I'm coming home in a few days for r and r maybe I'll pick up a couple books. I'll be at cabelas anyways. The wifey said i can buy a new predator rig, I'll be looking at the Tikka t3, Howa ranchland or a savage in .243. Those are the rifles I have narrowed down to seems like they are about neck and neck so I'm going to go shoulder a few and see what fit and finish I like as well as how it shoulders for me.
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 10/19/09 06:53 PM

Hey S1ngl3shot:

Don't know if you noticed but I provided you a reloading tool shopping list per your previous to last post, so take it with you when you go to Cabelas as you're spending bucks there anyway...they sell some of the list items.
Posted by: RogueAK

Re: help new reloaders - 11/07/09 11:28 PM

I have been reloading for over 30 years. This is all good advice that is being given.
Just hope that the new reloaders will follow some of it, and not be the guy that knows everything!

Good Hunting!
Posted by: sbranden

Re: help new reloaders - 11/10/09 08:01 PM

This has been an excellent read. I am relatively new to reloading, and brand new to this site. Great advice folks!

One topic I haven't seen be addressed yet in this thread is the question of how many times can you "safely" reload your brass. Are there any good rules of thumb on this?

I reload for 22 hornet, 222/223 rem, 204 ruger, 243 win. So what does everyone think - 10 times for the hornet, 5 for 222/223 class calibers, and maybe just 3 for other speedier (magnum type) rounds?

When I first began to research reloading, I decided I would:
1) buy factory ammo first for each new rifle
2) neck size only then
3) and invest in some better quality seater dies

So I get a Lee Deluxe Die kit which gives me a full length sizing option as well as a collet neck sizer die, plus a shell holder that you always need anyway. But then I like seater dies with a micrometer so that I can get my COL's really precise and minimize bullet runout.

In buying factory ammo initially, I build up a supply of perfectly fire formed brass, determine what type of bullets my gun prefers, get some idea about acceptable COL maximums (without pushing this 'seat to the lands' idea and getting myself into trouble with potentially huge pressure spikes).

I don't crimp, and I do neck size like I say - so both of these should help improve my case life. But I am looking for a good rule of thumb on when I should destroy reused brass... not push it to reload them "one more time" that ends up messing me up then.

In my first two years at this most enjoyable hobby I do have one incident to report which I have never fully been able to explain, so I will throw it out here now for everyone's consideration and comment and maybe this will generate some other ideas on "best practices" for all to benefit from.

First let me say that I did catch myself once putting Rem 6 1/2 primers (for my hornet) into my 222 rem casings (that should have been getting Rem 7 1/2 BR primers instead!), so it is definitely key to keep stuff separated. It is also key I believe to not be distracted as several others have mentioned, and to "divide and conquer" - break your steps down into whatever is a manageable block of time for you personally based on everything else you may have going on. So for example I'll clean my brass one day, deprime and neck size another, debur and chamfer the next sitting, measure and sort another, then prime everything the next chance I get, then charge & seat, etc. But on this one occasion I was reloading a charge that I had developed back in winter time for my 222 rem.

So a winter time 'max load' charge (that was VERY accurate) that...
Shot fine all throughout the winter.
Shot fine in Spring and early Summer.
Shot fine in later Summer then again also.
But on one shot while in the field - on a hot/humid day, a casing actually expanded against my bolt face and would not eject. Needless to say, my hunt ended early!

There are so many variables in this business. Was it truly a 'max load' issue? The local gunsmith fired more of my handloads just fine after replacing my ejector. Was it the heat of that particular day? Would a 6 1/2 where a 7 1/2 belonged have done this to me? Defective primer perhaps? Loose primer pocket maybe? Flash hole that wasn't completely clean when I reprimed? I did notice that the bolt was a little tight on that particular round when I went to chamber it up - so could my case length have been suspect?, or would a shoulder not have been bumped back properly due to neck sizing only?

I use a Rockchucker press, an RCBS digital caliper, a 5-0-5 scale where every charge is weighed to being as close to perfection as I can get them. So I feel my equipment is more than adequate.

The smith did say that on occasion you can get a powder buildup on these smaller calibers that doesn't get cleaned out when using a bore guide (as I do before every load development session) where the guide of course takes you right up to the chamber and doesn't help you clean around the outside walls of the chamber. Does that make any sense to you all?

Anyway, this little "situation" still haunts me to this day and although the varmint I was aiming at died that afternoon (the desired result) - and I didn't get hurt, and was only set back a little $$ in the big picture of things, well... the worst part of it all is not knowing what exactly I did wrong. Was it a casing that had simply been reloaded too many times? How do you know how many times is too many times??
Posted by: 1stpitch

Re: help new reloaders - 11/11/09 11:07 PM

In my experience, you can get a lot more loadings on a 223 and 243 case than the numbers you mention.

For one thing, in general I don't think you should ever shoot a load in the summer that was a max load in the winter. Hodgdon extruded powders may be the exception to this, but you'd be much safer working up the load again when it gets hot. Even the Hodgdon powders show some temp sensitivity.

Another thing you mentioned is your reloading routine. I was just telling this to a guy at work today, I NEVER seat primers in cases unless I am ready to charge with powder and seat a bullet right then. It's just too easy to put a different primer in that case and then forget what you did or why you did it the next session. What you're doing is worse than a simple distraction.
Posted by: Rem700 SS

Re: help new reloaders - 11/19/09 10:00 PM

i've got a hornady lock-n-load kit and a set of 204 dies that i have had for two month's, after reading some of these posts, probably stick w/ factory ammo!!!
Posted by: sbranden

Re: help new reloaders - 11/20/09 07:25 AM

So how many loadings, on average - for 222, 204, or 243 whatever experiences you have to share? That's the question.

My "max load" was a 20.5 of 4198 with a 50gr bullet in the case of the .222 rem. So a "book max", not something unique and extra "ify" that only I had ever tried, and in winter. Tell me how many people out there haven't tried this load before! Come on guys.

And on the primer thing, is a 6 1/2 way different from say a CCI 400 which people also pretty commonly use in 222 rem. ? Your point on "process" though is well taken 1stpitch.
Posted by: fxpro

Re: help new reloaders - 11/27/09 02:15 AM

I have always wanted to get into reloading and got the chance last year when I had a family member give me his old reloading equipment. Press, scale, .223 brass,primers powder the whole works. The first thing I did was READ the manuals he provided, he wanted me to call if I had any questions. Well to make a long story short, my first attempts went along smoothly except..I did'nt have a caliper to measure the overall length, so just seated the bullet down till it was the same length as a factory round...doing this by sight alone..scary stuff now that I think back. After completeing each round I would chamber each round to make shur the bolt closed. I know some of you are shuddering reading this..myself included. I would HIGHLY recommend anyone thats getting into reloading to have a experienced mentor to take you threw those first couple of rounds. Lots of good info on this thread, Be Safe!!
Posted by: OldTurtle

Re: help new reloaders - 11/27/09 08:50 AM

sbranden,,,, +1 on this advice..
Quote:
For one thing, in general I don't think you should ever shoot a load in the summer that was a max load in the winter. Hodgdon extruded powders may be the exception to this, but you'd be much safer working up the load again when it gets hot. Even the Hodgdon powders show some temp sensitivity.


I learned from experience when I first got into shooting Prairie Dogs and started reloading for my .204s...I loaded some in February and March, trying to get ready for a trip West in June..

Just the difference in temperature cause some tight bolt situations and I don't load "max. loads".... I'm not sure if the difference in elevations may have been a factor as well.,,.. But sitting in sun for hours shooting can allow your ammo to change properties to a degree.

Now, I prep my brass during the Winter months and don't charge the cases until right before I'm ready to leave (it really doesn't take that much time)...We also store our ammo in cheap styrofoam coolers to cut down the probability of rapid temperature changes..
Posted by: Gilly

Re: help new reloaders - 12/05/09 07:20 AM

Read up on the caliber you want to reload before you do anything and be sure of what can be expected from it. I use the low end of the scale when reloading and have always been happy with the results. When you do start reloading, distractions are your enemy. If in doubt, pour it out, and start again. A re-do is better than gun parts in your face.
Posted by: Rickyfur

Re: help new reloaders - 12/27/09 04:33 PM

I just bought a R-15 223 want to know what bullet type to use fot coyote.
I am going to reload . just need a good bullet type.
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 12/30/09 10:05 PM

Originally Posted By: sbranden
So how many loadings, on average - for 222, 204, or 243 whatever experiences you have to share? That's the question.

My "max load" was a 20.5 of 4198 with a 50gr bullet in the case of the .222 rem. So a "book max", not something unique and extra "ify" that only I had ever tried, and in winter. Tell me how many people out there haven't tried this load before! Come on guys.

And on the primer thing, is a 6 1/2 way different from say a CCI 400 which people also pretty commonly use in 222 rem. ? Your point on "process" though is well taken 1stpitch.


Branden:

Typically, you can expect 6-10 loadings...however, this varies due to how "hot" the loads, how tight/sloppy the chamber is [although the chamber is within the 6-7 thousandths range of SAMMI specs], whether you neck size only and full length re-size on the 4/5th reloading, how old the brass is....etc.

For the .222, the case necks are on the thin side, so sometimes they split before other calibers....

As a rule, I have a max of 1 grain below the manual max, and sometimes at 2 grains under the book max if accuracy and killing power is there anyway...that provides an additional pressure safety margin.

I work up my "maximum" i.e. hunting loads in the hot summer months of OH and thus, they are fine all year around. Consider powders that are NOT temperature sensitive...the relatively new ramshot line is one...XTerminator shoots great in the .222 and .223 (I load for both) Western powders which owns Ramshot and Alliant, have a very comprehensive, and FREE reloading manual with lab tested loads... so call or email them...they are great folks there at Western and will mail it in a day/two of speaking with you.

As to primers, I have stuck with CCIs over the years cause they were always available when I started reloading back in 1983. But, all brands are good.
Posted by: Old Yote

Re: help new reloaders - 02/24/10 07:22 PM

Been reloading 243, 270,30-30 & 300winmag for years but just bought my first 223. Bullet diameters have me a bid confused. I assume .222 diameter is a 222 swift, .223 is Rem and .224 is a Weatherby. I see very small assortment of .223 bullets listed and lots of .224. Does the .223 AR-15 shoot only the .223 bullets or does it shoot the .224 bullets.
Posted by: freefloat

Re: help new reloaders - 02/24/10 07:23 PM

The .223 shoots .224
Posted by: Old Yote

Re: help new reloaders - 02/24/10 07:38 PM

Thanks freefloat. I just went and got into the reloading manuel and looked it up.
Posted by: CA Desert Dog

Re: help new reloaders - 03/02/10 04:23 PM

Nic 58 makes a very good point and I will repeat it. Whatever you do, keep your mind on what you are doing. No wife distractions, no kids, no animals, just you and your reloading bench.

And always, always establish a defined routine and perform your various reloading steps in the same manner, every time. Check your simple beam scale for accuracy (zero adjust and weight setting) frequently and do not rely on the accuracy of electronic scales. Electronic scale accuracy can be effected by static electricity, fluorescent lights, ambient temperature, magnetic fields and other influences.

Keep a pad and pen handy and record all of the details of everything you do when building a load. Number your recipes and number your targets before going to the range. Test and record all results and file your 8.5 X 11 targets in a loose leaf binder for reference later.

Use care when handling primers and if a primer gets stuck somewhere, be very careful when removing it, especially if it is in close proximity to other primers.

Lyman has a pretty good basic reloading book. Buy it and read it. Lastly, you don't need to buy all of the big bucks brands of stuff. Lee makes a very inexpensive powder measure that is accurate and their Lee Auto-Prime tool works great too. Many of my die sets are from Lee and I have built very accurate rounds from them.

Don't always strive for the hottest load. Most times, the more moderate loads are the most accurate. They are a lot easier on your rifle barrel's throat too.
Posted by: hawkeye reloader

Re: help new reloaders - 03/06/10 10:55 PM

Handloading for Competition (making the target bigger) by Glen Zediker is a must have. So is Precision Reloading and Shooting Handbook by Fred Sinclair (Sinclair Intl.) Get a Loadbooks USA for your caliber in addition to a few reloading manuals. Lots to swallow there for a new-bee but great reference material. I say if at all possible, have someone show you how to reload first to get the basics. I like keeping a detailed journal as well as an Excel spreadsheet to document load success as well as other things like Trim-to-length, Headspace, Seating depth, COAL, etc. I bought a labeler and label the trim lengths on my trimmer for all my calibers, same with die slots for my Redding T-7, powder bottles, bullet/tool bins. Great advice on never throwing away test targets. Big mistake, almost as bad as selling a gun and wishing you had it back!
Posted by: Mr. Outdoors

Re: help new reloaders - 03/13/10 11:40 PM

Alot of great posts here. i just purchased my reloading rig last night. I will be doing a lot of reading before i get going here and am sure I will have questions,but it looks like i wont have a hard time finding the answers.
Posted by: FutureFNWO

Re: help new reloaders - 03/25/10 12:40 AM

im lookin to start reloading my 7mm Rem. Mag. any tips?
Posted by: Mr. Outdoors

Re: help new reloaders - 03/29/10 09:19 AM

i bought the charge master 1500 and i think its great. Very quick and accurate.
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 09/04/10 12:09 PM

Two good bullets for the .223 are the 52 gr. Speer HP and 50 gr. Sierra Blitz.

Also good in 40 gr. is the Sierra 40gr. HP

All three are generally "pelt friendly".
Posted by: RTLOF18918B

Re: help new reloaders - 10/15/10 04:17 AM

Originally Posted By: Wyocoyoter
Develope a routine and stick to it. Zero your scales periodically.

Buy your bullets, primers, brass & powder in bulk with the same lot numbers.

Good point on saving targets. I also have a target file with notes on each bull as to load, date, outside temp, rifle etc.

Keep your loading bench clean and well organized.


I will add to this. Do not zero your scales periodically. Zero your scales and calipers EVERY TIME YOU RELOAD OR MOVE YOUR SCALES FROM THEIR ORIGINAL POSITION AND CHECK THE ZERO FREQUENTLY.

Keep a routine down. Check the chambering in your rifle BEFORE you seat primers. Finally, IF YOU ARE POURING POWDER AND CHECK THE CASES YOU ARE SEATING THE BULLETS. FOLLOW THE ADVISE ON THIS FORUM. These guys know what they are talking about. I f you have question, stop and ask. Better safe than sorry.


RTLOF(TONY)
Posted by: Fat Albert

Re: help new reloaders - 11/04/10 08:38 PM

Reel Lost: All 22 center fire cartridges uses .224" BUT there are a couple that don't. The odd sizes are .222 that is used in 22 Jet shells that was a 357Mag necked to 22cal. used in S&W revolvers. The .223 bullets were for pre ww-2 22 Hornets that used 22 rimfire barrels. and the 22 Savage(303 Savage case necked down) uses .228 bullets( why? I don"t know.
Posted by: alleyyooper

Re: help new reloaders - 11/23/10 05:26 PM

Lots of good information here and some that should be taken with a grain of salt.

I pick up brass at the range, lots of high rollers who do not have time to reload use the clubs ranges. One can spot brass that is past it's experitation date with a bent paper clip and a good cleaning.

I do the powder drop and install the bullet and seat right then before going to a different case. No cases get a double charge that way. I'm old and slow and have all my body parts still.

Load well away in a scary part of the homestead from the family. You can sit on the couch for hours and hours twiddling your thumbs and no one says boo to you. Turn on the TV, Start reading,listening to the radio or start reloading then they (wife and kids) have all types of junk they need you for. If they can't see you all is well.

Keep plenty of loading blocks on hand so you can keep all cleaned and ready to go brass handy when you start reloading.

MAKE SURE YOU CLEAN AND INSPECT EVERY PIECE OF BRASS YOU ARE GOING TO RELOAD. Then inspect it again after you have reloaded it.


Want advice on the load for your 7 mm mag? Buy several reloading manual and do your own work up never trust a word of mouth or printed on a forum load. Typeing errors happen every day on the internet. Remember the thing in school to pass the message along to your neighbor and the end result was nothing like the orginal message?

Do you own work up and be safe.

I started reloading so long ago powder came in wax papper cans and kegs. Primers came in waxed cartons too. Herters was a bigger outdoor product supplier than Cabelas is today.

I keep records of my reloads and have Remington brass for the 243 and 308 that have been thru the press 20 plus times. Ya like me they are old and slow and accrite.

laugh Al
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 12/02/10 11:17 PM

alleyyooper:

Yes, and by God we love you for it! It's nice to have some one around here who knows something....
Posted by: meinidaho

Re: help new reloaders - 12/06/10 06:12 PM

Originally Posted By: sbranden

And on the primer thing, is a 6 1/2 way different from say a CCI 400 which people also pretty commonly use in 222 rem. ? Your point on "process" though is well taken 1stpitch.


DO NOT USE Remington 6 1/2 primers on anything near 222/223 size. They are specifically for lower pressure 22 calibers and you will get primer piercings and have to get a new firing pin among other problems. Read the note on the box and it will tell you what they are acceptable for.

PM if you want more info.
Posted by: 2400

Re: help new reloaders - 01/11/11 01:18 PM

Originally Posted By: Wyocoyoter
Develope a routine and stick to it. Zero your scales periodically.

Buy your bullets, primers, brass & powder in bulk with the same lot numbers.

Good point on saving targets. I also have a target file with notes on each bull as to load, date, outside temp, rifle etc.

Keep your loading bench clean and well organized.


Buying the same lots or powder, primers, bullets and brass is a great idea.

I agree with zeroing the scales, BUT buy some scale weights and use them to check to see that the scale weighs accurately then zero the scale every time. Only have one type of powder and primers on the bench at a time. I write the type of powder on my measure with a grease pencil. Never use anyones else's load data without checking it against several different books.

Develop a routine and stick to it don't, watch TV, have long conversations, talk on the phone when you're loading. If you're loading that's all you should be doing, stay focused and pay attention. Write ALL of your loads down and how they perform when you shoot them.
Posted by: Half cripple

Re: help new reloaders - 01/30/11 05:07 PM

I've read a lot of these suggestions and most are very good.

The most important thing to do is to understand what you are doing. So this doesn't mean one time through your reloading instructions. Reloading is almost as much fun as shooting but far more important safety wise.

After you understand what each step does then make a your own instructions in order of what you need to follow.

The first step is to inspect your brass. Make sure its all the same caliber and not damaged.

Then determine if the brass needs to be cleaned. I don't tumble my brass very often. Something I learned in benchrest shooting is all those guys use a sizing die wax in place of oil or grease. Its much cleaner and faster, and does a much better job. In addition after you have sized them you take a clean rag; I use mechanics shop rages, wipe each one by turning the brass inside of the rag. You'll be ammazed at what this does, it cleans and polishes the brass almost like new. As for the inside its not that important. So now size the brass. You'll have to check the papers with your dies for setting up your dies.

Now inspect each piece under a good light to make sure you have no split necks or spilts in the body of the brass. Also check the case mouth and primer pocket.

Next step if you aren't using boat tails is to use a neck expander die so you can seat the bullet without smashing the lip of the brass.

Clean and inspect your primer pockets. I use carbide primer pocket uniformers. It keeps the primer pockets clean and very uniform. At some place down the road you will understand how important this is to not only safety but accuracy as well.


Next is to prime each case. The best way is to use a priming tool as they seat each primer to the best uniformity, but also will not crush the primer, plus its very fast. I keep my primers in a small metal box with a hinge on the lid, and make sure you mark the box for what kind of primer it is. When done priming take your fingue and feel the primer seating for any that don't feel right. Your fingers are able to deteck variations as small as .002"-.003"

Now you have your brass prepared, this is the most time consuming part of reloading. Next get your reloading book in front of you and make sure you are looking at the right caliber bullet and load data and the correct powder. As everyone else has said before always start out below the recommended load, but be sure to read all load instructions first as some bullet loads have also listed that you can not go below a certain charge. The reason is you can get secondary ignition which creates very high pressures, dangerous to you and your rifle.

Next is to charge the brass, maing sure again you are using correct load data, powder and following all instructions. Always , always look at the inside of your brass and make sure you have not doubled the charge in any of the brass, nor have you missed any. Well seasoned loaders have done this so don't take it lightly. You have to do the charge inspection under decent lights. I have nothing but flouresents in my loading shop, safer in my opion.

Now seat your bullet with caution making sure it is ligned up with the throat of the brass. Pay attention to OAL (overall length) start long and then slowly adjust your die to the die desired length. If I am loading for a brand new gun/caliber I will seat bullets in a few dumy rounds (no powder or primer) and then chamber them, making sure they feed right and the bolt cloases all the way without any unusual pressure. Then pull the loaded round out and check the OAL of your seated bullet/round. If its shorter then required, you may want to reconsider seating the bullets further into the case. Another big danger of having ammo too long is if you extract a loaded round you may leave the bullet in the throat of your gun and dump powder all over inside your chamber and trigger, makes a real mess. If this aver happens to you your first priorty is to remove the bullet in the rifle. If you fail to get the bullet out and fire anotheer behind it you will have whats called a squib round and an exploision, your gun will be damaged, maybe ruined, and you could lose your eyes or your life. I had a squib round when goose hunting a few years back and the barrel ruptured. I was lucky as my injuries were only moderate. This was shooting factory ammo by the way so not my fault.

A hand full of years ago a man shooting at a Nationly sanctioned benchrest shoot had a live round in his chamber after the official called for cease fire, so he had to remove the live round and left the ram rod in the barrrel to retrieve the bullet he knocked out and inspect the chamber for powder. He ended up leaving the rod in the barrrel and lost his life when he began firing again. Saftey and keeping your mind on what you are doing is always worth the time and effort.

From here your next objective before going any further is to make sure your OAL is correct and the bullets are seating properly.

After this you can continue to tweak your load for best accuracy, not fastest speed. Its a real advantage to have a chronometer, maybe borrow one from your buddy and invite him over and the both of you can work up loads.

Always record all data. Brass, powder, primers, OAL and of course accuracy. For testing accuracy always fire 3 shot groups. Measure your groups and record the size.

One more rather obvious precaution is no smoking. I know I may have forgotten something so compare this list to the others.
Posted by: YoteAddiction

Re: help new reloaders - 04/23/11 02:49 AM

So, I don't think anyone came right out and said it, but would it be worthwhile at all to develop a load for the "average" weather conditions of each season if your going to be shooting the gun year round, or just load in warmer weather and remember to watch for signs of bad things happening?
Posted by: EJ Reichenbach

Re: help new reloaders - 04/28/11 03:45 PM

Always inspect your cartridge before you seat bullets. If you skip a shell and fire it in your rifle with just the primer and no powder the bullet stick in the barrel, then you discharge another round and it hits that bullet bye bye barrel.
Posted by: Three 44s

Re: help new reloaders - 05/25/11 01:09 AM

Originally Posted By: FutureFNWO
im lookin to start reloading my 7mm Rem. Mag. any tips?



Nothing specific to that most fine cartridge ........... (we have four in this household!!)


Three 44s
Posted by: Three 44s

Re: help new reloaders - 05/25/11 01:22 AM

The best way to describe handloading is to think of it as a "stand alone" hobby that is vertically integrated with shooting.

If you treat it as a step child .......... you are courting disaster.

The first thing before starting is to read several good manuals that give the basics of safe handloading.

These are well published and essential to give one a good start.

Second, you must KEEP READING!

I have been loading for 36 years and I STILL read EVERYTHING I can get my hands on to keep current and to KEEP LEARNING!

The day you stop learning ......... is the day you lay down and DIE!!!

Third, refrain from getting your loads from the internet!

......... it's akin to "hooking up" there .....

It's probably safer than to get some unseen persons load.

It's one thing to quote a published load and then look it up there ........ people make mistakes quoting something .... don't fall in that trap!

Take advice with the grain of salt (powder) ....... but verify!

Trust but Verify!!!

As many other's have said and repeated ..... DO NOT load with distractions! .... PERIOD!

Develop good habits! ...... charging cases are the PRIME area where one can get in a PECK of trouble.

When you start pouring powder ........ PAY ATTENTION and use a good method to stay safe!

If you are the sort of person that is out for instant gratification ........

............... you are not cut out for handloading!

If you want the BEST possible ammo for your weapons (on an affordable basis) and are willing to push your handloading to the forefront ...........

........... then handloading is for you!

Three 44s
Posted by: starke co boy

Re: help new reloaders - 12/14/11 04:39 PM

I am new on this site and glad i have a friend that pointed me to this site. I wanted to point out a mechanic in this one street light town that i live in makes up some pretty crazy stories in which i will not ever use him if my vehicles brake down. He claims to mix powders and has been doing this for a long time, he also claims to shoot 1 mile consistently with his 30-06. MIXING POWDERS IS STUPID> I warned him but I am 20 years younger than him so what do i know.
Posted by: Smith44699

Re: help new reloaders - 12/17/11 09:24 AM

Originally Posted By: YoteAddiction
So, I don't think anyone came right out and said it, but would it be worthwhile at all to develop a load for the "average" weather conditions of each season if your going to be shooting the gun year round, or just load in warmer weather and remember to watch for signs of bad things happening?


One load. Use a good powder that is temp resistant. This is figuring you haven't worked a load up at 0 degrees Went way over max load. Then shot the same load at 100 degrees. That would be foolish. Keep load at or below max you will not have any problems. You just might to get different dopes for the temp extremes.
Posted by: Smith44699

Re: help new reloaders - 12/17/11 09:27 AM

Originally Posted By: starke co boy
I am new on this site and glad i have a friend that pointed me to this site. I wanted to point out a mechanic in this one street light town that i live in makes up some pretty crazy stories in which i will not ever use him if my vehicles brake down. He claims to mix powders and has been doing this for a long time, he also claims to shoot 1 mile consistently with his 30-06. MIXING POWDERS IS STUPID> I warned him but I am 20 years younger than him so what do i know.


Kinda make you wonder how he got to be 20 years older! Lol. Just to bad a new comer to loading might go for his info.
Posted by: jeremey

Re: help new reloaders - 01/04/12 01:53 PM

great stuff, safety ALWAYS...
Posted by: bigblock

Re: help new reloaders - 01/06/12 07:29 PM



WELL SAID BUZZ BEE !!!
Posted by: yotenewbie

Re: help new reloaders - 01/07/12 10:39 AM

Looking at this forum for the first time and haved learned a thing or two right away. I have just obtained an RCBS loading kit and am off to Cabelas for powder, primers,bullets, etc. I want to start with a varmint load for my 25-06. I have read the Speer manual that came with my kit and the bullets they offer. Am interested in a load that will hopefully be somewhat pelt-friendlier than others since my son-in-law traps and sells furs as a hobby. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 01/07/12 11:55 AM

yotenewbie:

A good place to start for varmint loads in your 25/06 [yes, I have reloaded for one for 25 years] is Norma MRP powder and the the Hornady and Sierra 75-90 grain varmint bullets.

Work up to 57 grains of MRP and use the Hornady 75 gr. HP and the Sierra 90 gr. HPBT bullets.

MRP can often be difficult to find, but stellar results will be worth the search.

Also, IMR 4350, IMR 4064, IMR 4831, and Reloder 22 are good powders as well for the 100-120 weight bullets, and are not bad at all with the lighter weights.

Standard primers are fine; I have used mainly CCI primers over the years.

Good Luck!
Posted by: yotenewbie

Re: help new reloaders - 01/07/12 12:30 PM


Buckeyespecial

Thanks for info . I have a second home in Montana and have opportunities for longer shots on several ranches I can hunt. How would lighter grain bullets like 75-90 gr (I have seen a Hornady 60 grain)work with longer shots? My limited experience is with deer loads (Remington core-lokt 120 gr and Federal vital shok 115 gr)? Effective but too much damage for hide preservation.

Impressive number of posts by the way!
Posted by: Half cripple

Re: help new reloaders - 01/07/12 04:19 PM

The heavier bullets normal have a higher ballistic cooefiecient, that is if they have the same nose design as the ligher bullets. Sierra Match Kings are likely the best there are, especially with the heavier weight bullets.
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 01/07/12 04:42 PM

yotenewbie:

Well, MT is great coyote country; the 90 gr. bullets will have the edge on accuracy/wind drift on very long shots as its ballistic coefficient (BC) and sectional density (SD) are better than the 75 grain.

I loaded the 75 gr. more as it was faster, more explosive, and less apt to ricochet on groundhogs here in the midwest. So, that weight bullet does have some "best" attributes there...

The MT pale coyote pelts can be quite valuable on the fur market, so the 90 gr. will be less explosive on pelts, although at long range the 75 HP may also do well as it slows down at longer ranges.

My post numbers are not indicative of anything knowledgeable. Enjoy your 25/06.
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 01/07/12 04:49 PM

Half Cripple:

I never tried the MatchKings, but I am sure they are excellent performing bullets.

What the 25/06 really needs is some 125-130 grain, non-copper, non-VLD hunting bullets to further boost its BC and SD numbers[think Nosler Partition in those weights]. The minimal loss in velocity will be outweighed by its even greater versatility than it already has...

Guess the demand is not there to make a market....
Posted by: Hedge

Re: help new reloaders - 01/14/12 02:12 AM

Scanned through the topic and might have missed this but, if I did, it won't hurt to reiterate.

Some powders have the same number or similar names. BE SURE you pick the right powder from the book. H4895 is not IMR4895 (close but not the same). Clay's is not Universal Clays nor is it International Clay's. They are 3 different powders with different burning characteristics. 8208M is not 8208XBR. There are many other examples, but you get the idea.
Posted by: Crowsniper.17HMR

Re: help new reloaders - 01/21/12 05:16 PM

Just purchased some Hornady V-Max 35gr 22-250 bullets. According to Hogdon Data...the C.O.L should be set to 2.35. This is not possible because of the short bullet length. If I set the bullet on top of the brass..not seated..it measures 2.34. Suggestions?
Posted by: doggin coyotes

Re: HELP - 01/21/12 06:08 PM

Originally Posted By: Crowsniper.17HMR
Just purchased some Hornady V-Max 35gr 22-250 bullets. According to Hogdon Data...the C.O.L should be set to 2.35. This is not possible because of the short bullet length. If I set the bullet on top of the brass..not seated..it measures 2.34. Suggestions?


Ya know, if there ain't a law forbidding the loading of a 35 grain bullet in a 22-250 case, there should be! I don't think that bullet was ever designed for a 22-250. Good grief.

Did you really find reloading data for that particular bullet in a 22-250?
Posted by: doggin coyotes

Re: HELP - 01/21/12 06:13 PM

I just noticed you changed the title/subject line of the thread.

There was another guy here recently that was fond of doing that. It didn't go over very well for him. You might not wanna do that anymore.
Posted by: Crowsniper.17HMR

Re: help new reloaders - 01/21/12 08:09 PM

Originally Posted By: doggin coyotes
I just noticed you changed the title/subject line of the thread.

There was another guy here recently that was fond of doing that. It didn't go over very well for him. You might not wanna do that anymore.


Well...."if" I did it....which I didn't mean to...or have any reason to good grief. People want information and you are worried about subject lines.
Posted by: Crowsniper.17HMR

Re: help new reloaders - 01/22/12 12:08 PM

Originally Posted By: Crowsniper.17HMR
Just purchased some Hornady V-Max 35gr 22-250 bullets. According to Hogdon Data...the C.O.L should be set to 2.35. This is not possible because of the short bullet length. If I set the bullet on top of the brass..not seated..it measures 2.34. Suggestions?


Just wanted to do an update....Shot this group today from my truck @ 100 yards. The bench was my mirror....seems they will be ok.

Posted by: ZBob

Re: help new reloaders - 01/28/12 04:38 PM

Whew, just read all 10 pages of this. Great info from all. While reading other than Safety being foremost. The other thing I seen a lot of was DO NOT RELOAD for others. I understand the reasoning and the liabilities. But if you load a load with Factory specs what is the difference. I mean here in Fla you go to a Gun Show and there are several guys selling loads of reloads in baggies. How are they getting around the fact that they aren't working up a load for a specific gun. Just wondering.
Posted by: ghilljr

Re: help new reloaders - 01/29/12 09:30 PM

wow what a great thread .thanks guys.i am going start reloading soon.i am doing alot of reading now to make sure its for me.When working up a load, starting low to higher.how much powder should be added ?
Posted by: Jack Roberts

Re: help new reloaders - 01/29/12 09:44 PM

Working up 1% at a time is safe. In a small case that could be .2 gr, in a large case that could be closer to a grain.

Jack
Posted by: Klappy

Re: help new reloaders - 02/27/12 06:57 PM

Great stuff for a newbie like me. Thanks for sharing your expertise.
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 03/02/12 10:52 PM

Resizing Cases For Optimal Headspace and Chambering


If you want to monitor your case stretch from head to shoulder (headspace) for optimal resizing invest in an RCBS Precision Mic to measure the before/after sizing headspace (RCBS # 88304 for the .223) MSRP $64.95.

There is a SAMMI headspace range [maximum and minimum] established for all standard caliber chambers, and this gauge will measure how much you have set cartridge headspace back in resizing, ideally 1-2 thousandths maximum, to most closely approximate the headspace of your chamber while allowing the case dimension to chamber but have minimal "slop" (movement).

You can [by error] set the shoulder back too much i.e. under the minimum SAMMI range, and use of the Precision Mic will prevent that from happening (if read correctly) and will prevent the subsequent case separation above the head caused my going belowthe minimum SAAMI headspace limit.

An article on this issue and use of the RCBS Mic gauge in the March, 2012 Shooting Times, although it could have been written more clearly.

Hornady also sells a similar tool (a bit lower cost than the RCBS Mic) that works with the Stony Point system that mounts on your dial caliper.

With either tool, you can precisely measure your shoulder movement as you adjust your dies to obtain the setting you want i.e. 1-2 thousandths shoulder set-back.

All the above presumes your rifle's chamber was machined to SAMMI specs i.e. correctly to start with.
Posted by: Ernest II

Re: help new reloaders - 03/07/12 04:26 PM

Correct me if I am wrong. I use to reload but not a lot. I remember that I always started like 75% of max and actually I never went up to max loads cause the 75%r,s shot great. ALso if memory serves me light loads can cause as much danger as over loading. And yes stay focused. I use to weigh my brass and seperate by weight and bullets and after loading I woul weight each cartridge. You might find one thats been double charged with powder and the weight will give it away.
Daryl P.
Posted by: Hedge

Re: help new reloaders - 03/07/12 06:31 PM

You're right about under loading with the wrong powder, Ernest.
Although the exact mechanism which causes detonation hasn't been identified, to my knowledge, there is sufficient correlation to raise a red flag.

There are powders that can be used for reduced loads, but they are caliber specific and can be found at Hodgdon's web site.
Trailboss is an exception and can be used in a wide variety of calibers.
Posted by: Hedge

Re: help new reloaders - 03/07/12 06:36 PM

Quote:
How are they getting around the fact that they aren't working up a load for a specific gun. Just wondering.


It's buyer beware. You don't know what powder or primer they're using. You have no idea how it will perform in your gun. IMO, you're buying a pig in a poke. I won't do it.
Posted by: get2callin

Re: help new reloaders - 04/01/12 12:18 AM

I learned the hard way. After i built my AR I hand loaded some once fired brass that i bought online. I noticed that some of the rounds would not chamber correctly. I did some reading and found out that you MUST use small base dies with auto loaders and i was using a standerd one that we use on our bolt rifles oops! I have since corrected the problem it would have been helpfull if i would have read into it more. Lesson Learned
Posted by: dmpowder

Re: help new reloaders - 04/01/12 12:41 AM

Originally Posted By: get2callin
I learned the hard way. After i built my AR I hand loaded some once fired brass that i bought online. I noticed that some of the rounds would not chamber correctly. I did some reading and found out that you MUST use small base dies with auto loaders and i was using a standerd one that we use on our bolt rifles oops! I have since corrected the problem it would have been helpfull if i would have read into it more. Lesson Learned


So not true!
Posted by: Raspack

Re: help new reloaders - 08/04/12 06:56 PM

This may be a stupid question but here goes anyway. I have used up my first pound of RL22 in some 7mm rounds and love the powder. When I go to buy some more should I be concerned at all about the new powder having the same characteristics as the powder I just used? In other words should I back off a grain or so just to be safe or can I continue to load as I have been?
Posted by: prairiefire

Re: help new reloaders - 08/31/12 09:19 AM

New reloader here - appreciate all this info. It already has made me much more careful and less cavalier about the process.
Posted by: esmith

Re: help new reloaders - 09/06/12 11:03 PM

Originally Posted By: Raspack
This may be a stupid question but here goes anyway. I have used up my first pound of RL22 in some 7mm rounds and love the powder. When I go to buy some more should I be concerned at all about the new powder having the same characteristics as the powder I just used? In other words should I back off a grain or so just to be safe or can I continue to load as I have been?


Two answers here. And which one is for you depends on how picky of a reloader/shooter you are.

Technically if the powder is from the same lot number (the powder is from the same batch from the factory) then you should be able to assume (there is that dangerous word again) that the powder will perform the same as your other container from the same lot number.

If the powders are from different lot numbers, then in theory, you should re-develop your load just to make sure it performs the same. This tends to be something a meticulous and picky reloader might do. But even then sometimes not. Frankly, I don't push the limits all that often when I load, so I'm not too concerned when I buy any of my usual powders, and I've yet to see any noticeable difference between one old container and one new container of ANY powder I've bought. I'm certain there are exceptions to the rule however.

That said, the above is possibly less true with commercial powders packaged for the reloading market. One pound of Bullseye, AA2230, U-Clays, W296, etc is likely almost the same, if not the same as a container you bought several years prior or after. Powders used in bulk, by ammunition companies, tend to come by the ton, and those companies tend to test each new batch individually as they would want to ensure the powder's performance before loading millions of rounds with it etc.

This is what I have read and been told by those smarter and more researched than myself. So just a friendly regurgitation for ya!
Posted by: triggertap

Re: help new reloaders - 09/17/12 10:58 AM

I am brand new to reloading. I recently bought the hornady lock and load kit with the extras it did not have. I have only loaded for my rem 700 vtr in .243. I have only used varget so far because i heard it was an extreme powder that was not affected by temp. I have read several things that say if you want one powder that will work in almost everything you own then start with varget. I see that my gun seems to shoot best with the high end or max load in the Lyman book. The Lyman book goes "hotter" than the Hornady book seems to. Shouls this be a concern?
Posted by: triggertap

Re: help new reloaders - 09/17/12 11:03 AM

I am brand new to reloading. I recently bought the hornady lock and load kit with the extras it did not have. I have only loaded for my rem 700 vtr in .243. I have only used varget so far because i heard it was an extreme powder that was not affected by temp. I have read several things that say if you want one powder that will work in almost everything you own then start with varget. I see that my gun seems to shoot best with the high end or max load in the Lyman book. The Lyman book goes "hotter" than the Hornady book seems to. Shouls this be a concern?
Posted by: esmith

Re: help new reloaders - 09/17/12 12:26 PM

Originally Posted By: triggertap
I am brand new to reloading. I recently bought the hornady lock and load kit with the extras it did not have. I have only loaded for my rem 700 vtr in .243. I have only used varget so far because i heard it was an extreme powder that was not affected by temp. I have read several things that say if you want one powder that will work in almost everything you own then start with varget. I see that my gun seems to shoot best with the high end or max load in the Lyman book. The Lyman book goes "hotter" than the Hornady book seems to. Shouls this be a concern?


Varget is extremely popular and for good reason. The only way to verify if it is temp. sensitive for you is to shoot them over a chronograph. Otherwise, if you aren't seeing pressure signs from your brass/primers, or noticeable differences in POI/POA during season changes I wouldn't worry about temp. sensitivity much. If you are loading to the very maximum charges recommended, then yes, you better do your due diligence and figure this out.

As far as different manuals having different ranges, that is very common. Each company has their own "risk management" level for limiting their liability. Each company also has different test rigs, equipment, etc. It is a really good idea to take your load data from multiple manuals, as there is often errors in printed manuals. Plus you can sort of take the "average" from multiple manuals instead of trusting just one.

Good questions!
Posted by: OldTurtle

Re: help new reloaders - 09/17/12 02:34 PM

Quote:
Plus you can sort of take the "average" from multiple manuals instead of trusting just one.
...Excellent Advice...
I'd still start at least a full grain lower than any published max. load and work up carefully...
Very carefully when you start arriving at "Max" as all it takes is a weak or overused piece of brass and you have a serious potential for a problem/injury...
Posted by: esmith

Re: help new reloaders - 09/17/12 03:42 PM

Yep, you must work up a load in any rifle! Case in point, my Savage 12 LPV has an extremely efficient (tight) chamber right out of the box from the factory. In .223 Rem.

If I load at the middle of the range in either my Hornady, Lyman or Speer manuals, I consistently get high pressure signs such as cratered primer, pierced primer and flattened headstamps. Talking with several reloaders MUCH more experienced than me, they said back down enough to eliminate those dangerous pressure signs and try it. That rifle takes a full grain UNDER the Minimum recommended charge in two out of my three manuals, and over a chrono the fps is as fast as a normal load.

Goes to show that working up carefully is something you cant skip. Might work 75% of the time, but you will get caught. Could have been holding a hand grenade in another situation like this, just going straight to hot loads.
Posted by: willy1947

Re: help new reloaders - 11/17/12 01:21 PM



A lot of good ideas here. The NRA has a course for new reloaders. It is a good place to start.
Posted by: CritterAcres

Re: help new reloaders - 02/28/13 08:02 AM

Pressures will peak faster in a smaller caliber than in a larger one. Just because you can make .5 grain jumps in a 30-06 DON"T try to do it with a 17 fireball.
Posted by: panicky joe

Re: help new reloaders - 03/14/13 10:45 AM

As others have said, reference several sources and you'll see different data! Back in the 80's, I developed a load development chart to be filled in later by referencing various manuals. Here is a "workup" for my Remington 700 VS .308 from the fall of '94. I was looking for a load for 168 gr. bullets and had two powders on hand that were in six different manuals on my shelf. Not only are the numbers written down for starting and maximum loads, but I plotted them out graphically for a visual.

Notice that the Hornady manual has a maximum charge of IMR-4895 that is 39.5 grains and both the Speer and Hodgdon manuals have 40 grains as a starting load! Well, they are using different test rifles, lots of powder and bullets. Primer differences, atmospheric conditions differ, barrel dimension tolerances, brass volume, etc.

What this demonstrates is that you should reference several sources when working up a load. Also, imagine what would have happened if somebody only had the Speer book and didn't heed the advice to start with the starting load. For example, "they show 40 to 44 grains, so I'll start in the middle at 42 grains". That load of 42 grains is maximum in Sierra and Hodgdon and over max. in Hornady. Not a good thing.

Posted by: gene10pntr

Re: help new reloaders - 04/09/13 08:57 PM

This is all good stuff...full of valuable information. I'm just thinking about getting into reloading and have already picked up valuable pointers! Thanks guys!!! Keep on writing about do's and don'ts/pro's and con's on the subject.
Posted by: rio

Re: help new reloaders - 04/16/13 10:59 PM

The reloading manuals may seem expensive when you see them on the shelf. But they are well worth the money. I have learned a ton from Hornady,Speer,and others.
They have great data. But even more they explain how everything works. The money spent will be enjoyable for years of shooting.
Posted by: mieracle13

Re: help new reloaders - 04/23/13 10:35 PM

Thank you for all your help and advice from everyone who too the time and effort I am very thankful
Posted by: Softfoot

Re: new reloaders - 05/21/13 10:32 AM

Link not working
Posted by: Rbreb13

Re: new reloaders - 05/21/13 12:12 PM

Originally Posted By: Softfoot
Link not working
What/Which link? Use the quote function.
Posted by: trapper300RUM

Re: help new reloaders - 06/01/13 03:19 AM

I was taught to read the loading manual like my life depended on it because it really does . My uncle started me in reloading when i was 17 years old & i have been reloading eversince & now i am 49 years old not saying that i know more than any of the reloaders who has been reloading as long as i have iam still learning new things One thing is for IRON CLAD SURE GO BY WHAT YOR LOADING MANUAL STATES & START AT THE START CHARGE & WORK YOUR WAY TILL YOU FIND A LOAD THAT YOU GUN LIKES & if any of you new reloaders have any questions feel free to ask any of us I would love to help someone out & if i don't know the answer we will find someone who does PLEASE follow your loading manual & it will ensure that reloading is a wonderful thing to do or it very well could be the last thing you do . BE SAFE & ENJOY RELOADING !!
Posted by: ghilliedup

Re: help new reloaders - 06/21/13 04:27 PM

my advice isn't worth much but here it is:

Buy a $15 Lee reloading manual and read it. The amount of info in it (besides the load data obviously) is good to know and you'll be ahead of 2/3 of the general shooting population. There are things you have never even considered going on in that chamber every time you pull the trigger and that manual will shed some light on it. Not to mention you will grasp the concept of reloading much faster!

ENJOY!

Oh yeah, start with a single stage press for rifle, its all you'll ever really need for hunting/target shooting
Posted by: sceeder

Re: help new reloaders - 07/17/13 12:51 AM

all powder is going to shoot different. Always be cautious.
Posted by: tugboater

Re: help new reloaders - 07/28/13 09:28 AM

Im new to reloading and all your guys advise is sound. I work on Tugboats on the west coast and Alaska. I have lots of time to read on the boat so I bought 3 reloading manuals and read them all 3 times before I even started to reload. Working up loads I will start at the bottom and work up to max but have not gone past it. I wiegh every charge messure every case and check the C.O.L on every round so they are all the same. It takes me forever to reload a bunch, but I enjoy it! Ive learned some good habits from reading those books, and my wife and kids know when daddy's in the man room im not to be bother'd.
Posted by: 6.5x61Super

Re: help new reloaders - 09/07/13 02:50 PM

This years marks my 25th year as a reloader.

The single most important piece of advice I can give to new as well as experienced reloaders:


DO NOT BE DISTRACTED = REMOVE ALL DISTRACTIONS FROM YOUR RELOADING ENVIRONMENT.


You are assembling "mini-bombs" so to speak, 1 grain or even a few tenths of a grain separates a "hot load" from a small bomb with you having a front row seat.
Posted by: zorro700

Re: help new reloaders - 10/16/13 10:26 AM

Haven't read all the posts but DON'T FORGET TO CASE LUBE BEFORE FULL LENGTH RESIZING! You'll be spending ALOT of time trying to dig out a stuck case without damaging the die.
Posted by: Born

Re: help new reloaders - 11/20/13 01:49 PM

I just read this entire thread. I was hoping to get some idea of what kind of equipment to buy to get started. There were a couple members that have recomended various products, and a few reloading manuals.

Where is a good place to shop for reloading supplies?

Are there any good kits to get a person started? Is more expensive kits better than some of the less expensive ones? Is a kit a good idea or should a person just buy the stuff seperatly?

If buying used eguipment are there anything to look for as far as condition?

I would like to reload 223 22-250 and 308

How do you decide what powder and bullets to use? From some manual?

If I shoot less than 40 rounds a year with my most used gun should I just buy it off the shelf?
Posted by: Orneryolfart357

Re: help new reloaders - 11/20/13 02:10 PM

I would recommend getting a reloading book first, such as "The ABC's of reloading. Read through it and see if this is an investment that is worth what you pay to get started. I Started with a Lee kit. As I reloaded more I just started buying items from the classifids and built my own kit that I use now. If you are only shooting 2 boxes of shells per year it may not be cost effective to invest $3-400 or more to reload. Good luck.
Posted by: Born

Re: help new reloaders - 11/20/13 02:26 PM

I think I will get the ABC's and read it. Honest answers are appreciated.
Posted by: weisenbaker

Re: new reloaders - 11/26/13 02:07 PM

when I wanted to start reloading my father said buy a bible[hornady reloading book] and read it cover to cover and when i rolled my own i started with a lee classic loader in 223 it was slow but it worked started buying bits and pieces and bought my own dies for his old rock chucker and now i have a lee turret i make copies of the pages need for the loads so that the bible stays clean
Posted by: jonathankansas03

Re: new reloaders - 12/01/13 08:49 PM

Just read 5 reloading manuals. Everyone is VERY different because they use different standards. Sierra,Hornady, Nosler, Lee, and Lyman. They all have different bullets loads etc. No questions here as they've been studied. One thing that I will emphasize that my father has always done, is cross reference your loads. E.G.: Hornady 50 gr v-max in a 22-250. Both books have different loads. Different maxes and different starters.
You have to remember that every barrel, chamber, vibrations etc., are different in every rifle. Every rifle action, barrel etc, has had different loads factory, or hand rolled. Used in different temps, string of 20 shots in one, 5 in the other. Cleaning regimens,[beeep], even the same powders with different batch numbers.
It's not about speed, its about precision. Kind of like a blueprinted car and one with a bunch of bolt-ons. Blueprinted one may not even be faster; but in the end it will drive smoother, and last longer.
It's amazing what you can gather from a small amount of reading. Also, make sure you re-read the portions on semi-autos for port pressure. I have a Garand, a Rem 750 AND an Ar-15. They are very helpful and knowledgeable; and keep people from thinking you have a full auto rifle.
Don't rush in!!! Just like anything else, "getting into it" takes time. Get a bench, reload manuals, then research on what the best kit for you will be. Take your time and you could save a lot of money. Go one caliber at a time, and work up whats best. You want to do it all at once, but just remember what you are doing. Go one step at a time. It should never be routine.
Don't let anyone else con you into using your equipment while your not there.
And always follow step one : MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS ORGANIZED BEFORE YOU EVEN BEGIN!!!
Posted by: Iron mike

Re: new reloaders - 01/24/14 09:56 PM

Record keeping has been mentioned before and there is no way to express just how important this is in making accurate safe loads. The successful formula is important but just as important is good readable accurate notes about the gun and all things pertaining to the finished product including before and after pressure measurements and firing range results. The more you document the easier it is to reproduce accurate tested loads. A big part of my doing this is that I have been doing it sense 1976 and have collected a really large amount of data covering many calibers. The record data started out on a manual spread sheet, and once computers became a big part of my work and personal life it was all transferred to an Excel spread sheet one sheet for each rifle and each caliber plus inventories of powder, bullets primers and brass. It includes the following CASE, BULLET, WEIGHT, PRIMER, POWDER, CHARGE, BURN RATE, LOW VELOCITY, HIGH VELOCITY, EXTREME SPREAD, AVERAGE VELOCITY, STANDARD DEVIATION, OVER ALL LENGTH, BOOK VELOCITY, MEASURED GROUP, AND NOTES. To date there is information for 374 loads from 43 different guns. Each gun I own has a story to tell and it is all here in the same place. If I have done this right any one of you should able to pick up any rifle I own and from this information produce good safe loads. This spread sheet evolved and has changed many times over the years becoming more useful as time has passed, Some day god willing I get to go home. When this happens all of the toys go to my only son. Neither of my son in laws have any interest in hunting or guns so he got lucky. Two of my grand sons and a great grandson will share in the booty as well. I want them to enjoy what has given me enjoyment for years but most of all I want them to do it safely.
Posted by: Guzzy

Re: help new reloaders - 01/30/14 03:19 PM

The guy who taught me to reload said "never load more than five or six rounds till you know how they are going to shoot in your gun". That advice has saved me a lot of grief.
Posted by: CatShooter

Re: help new reloaders - 01/30/14 05:46 PM

Originally Posted By: Guzzy
The guy who taught me to reload said "never load more than five or six rounds till you know how they are going to shoot in your gun". That advice has saved me a lot of grief.


Must have taken a loooooong time to work up a load!
Posted by: pahntr760

Re: help new reloaders - 02/03/14 10:21 AM

Originally Posted By: CatShooter
Originally Posted By: Guzzy
The guy who taught me to reload said "never load more than five or six rounds till you know how they are going to shoot in your gun". That advice has saved me a lot of grief.


Must have taken a loooooong time to work up a load!



I do 5 at each charge...not only 5-6 total. That seems silly.
Posted by: Shynloco

Re: new reloaders - 02/27/14 09:12 AM

Originally Posted By: Jack Roberts
The loads listed in a manual may not be safe in your rifle. Depending on lots of things but mostly weather your chamber is larger or smaller than average, max loads may be seriously overpressure. That's why you always have to work up loads.

Jack


Jack makes an excellent point about working up a load. On the flip side of getting too extreme, there are dangers in "under-loading" powders as well. Reloading manuals have a low and a high. Because of the powder shortage issue, don't get cute by going too far under where the amount of powder is LESS than the halfway amount in a casing that is turned horizontally as upon ignition, gases will build up in the empty space above the powder rather quickly and can easily blow your rifle into pieces. Had a friend experience exactly that with a new Savage Model 12 (.223 caliber) and he'd been reloading for more than 40 yrs. So you see, reloading can be lots of fun, but has some inherent dangers you must be aware of. Good luck and welcome to the world of reloading and enjoy.

Alex
Posted by: minerwelder

Re: help new reloaders - 03/16/14 03:32 PM

Another good rule reload for each gun specific, it might work great in yours but not your buddys.
Posted by: RobertSubnet

Re: help new reloaders - 03/19/14 09:08 PM

One thing I do not think I saw here is case gauges. Case gauges not only measure the length of your case but the gauge will also tell you if your newly made round will properly chamber.

An early mistake of mine was to over expand some .45acp cases. I did not know any better until I got to the range and discovered the mistake when I attempted to chamber the rounds. Knowing about case gauges would have saved me a lot of grief.

I now own Wilson gauges for every caliber I shoot and every round is checked using them.
Posted by: CatShooter

Re: help new reloaders - 03/19/14 10:02 PM

Originally Posted By: RobertSubnet
One thing I do not think I saw here is case gauges. Case gauges not only measure the length of your case but the gauge will also tell you if your newly made round will properly chamber.

An early mistake of mine was to over expand some .45acp cases. I did not know any better until I got to the range and discovered the mistake when I attempted to chamber the rounds. Knowing about case gauges would have saved me a lot of grief.

I now own Wilson gauges for every caliber I shoot and every round is checked using them.



That is not necessarily true.

In 2010, I restarted a local ammunition company that went out of business, with 80,000 rounds of 223 that was returned because it wouldn't chamber - every one of those rounds went through a Wilson gauge before it was originally shipped.
Posted by: OldTurtle

Re: help new reloaders - 03/20/14 07:51 AM

I have a Ed Brown match barrel in .40s&w on a Para Ordnance that will not accept any brass that was fired in an 'unsupported' chamber, such as Glock and a few others have and they have been FL sized in Lee dies and pass the commercial Chamber Check gauge test....So a check gauge is not always a viable method...In that weapon, I have to pull the barrel and use it as a check gauge unless I'm reloading brass that was previously shot in that firearm or one with a fully supported chamber...

My .204 AR has a custom cut chamber in a 'match grade' barrel and my check gauge for that one is cut from a piece of the same barrel stock and was cut with the same reamer at the time the barrel was chambered, otherwise a commercial .204 gauge will not work either...
Posted by: Sensai

Re: help new reloaders - 04/15/14 12:08 PM

A couple of things: First - STOP when unsure. If you think something is wrong, but can't quite put your finger on it; you're probably right. Go through everything from the beginning and don't load anything else until you find out what is bothering you. Sometimes it's important, and sometimes it's not, but check anyway. Second (but along the same lines) - pay attention to the sound and recoil level when you're firing. Most, I'll say the vast majority, of blown up guns are caused by perfectly good rounds that have the misfortune of being fired right behind bloopers that don't clear the barrel. If a round doesn't sound or feel right, don't pull the trigger again until you know why! It's just my habit, but I take a range rod to check the bore on my guns when I'm developing loads. A visual check will suffice if you can see down the barrel, but a rod is easier with autos and lever actions to me. Just use a soft one and keep it clean. A metal rod or a dirty rod can ruin your barrel crown in a hurry. Best wishes, Gary
Posted by: 280Guy

Re: help new reloaders - 06/17/14 05:37 PM

Don't get distracted. Stop reloading when someone comes into the room.
Posted by: Sodakian

Re: help new reloaders - 06/24/14 07:33 AM

With all the new powders being put in plastic containers I keep a can or two of static guard on hand. I get dry skin in the winter when I do most of my reloading. This can cause static discharge in the right conditions. I spray a light mist around the area before I open the container to start pouring.

I had a friend who was reloading and he said he was wearing a flannel type shirt and while lifting the 8 lb keg up to pour it he had a small static discharge right before he opened it.
Posted by: 07yzrysder

Re: help new reloaders - 11/10/14 07:58 PM

not sure if this has been posted yet or not but it is a reality check to new and seasoned reloaders. Check and double check your powder. Keep only the powder your using within reach.

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=553905

Posted by: chrs_28

Re: help new reloaders - 11/14/14 11:06 PM

i watched a friend (10+ years experience reloader) get a squib load in his 1911. Than before the end of day he shot another and before anyone could stop him, he pulled the trigger on a jammed squib. Blew his barrel up, but he walked away with no injuries. Another shoot i watched my same friend shoot a double charge out of his 1911. Not only having the experience and following your load books and records important but paying attention while reloading regardless of amount of time reloading. Seeing these things happen really put me back in my place when i reload. No TV, radio, or kids.
Posted by: scoremaster

Re: help new reloaders - 12/31/14 08:15 AM

that's why I set my reloading bench up in the garage most time the kids and the wife don't come in there and I can keep focused on what im doing . just to touch on the subject of books I use sierra book for load working as they kinda get you started in the right direction with a accuracy load but that comes with a grain of salt as like said before that comes with their barrel and action and controlled conditions not ral world outside stuff. but I feel they have the best info for me .
and then on the other end of the spectrum I also like the nosler book as it touches on case capacity and this was mentioned before about underloading or light loads . the slower the powder the fuller the case and the fuller the case the better the burn . now this also takes some careful watching as not all is equal in the world as we know it . so yes to all that was said about take your time read study and then make your plans . keep your area clean and clear and only do one thing at a time no powder till it's time to put it in no primers on the table while your cleaning cases and so forth and get a plan and stick with it do everything in order the same everytime all the time that way there are no missed steps . there is a lot of great advice here . these are just some of mine . right now I can figure about 50 -60 dollors to load 100 300 weatherby shells ,but this don't figure in the cases dies and press priming tool and other little things that one may need so if just shooting a few rounds a year reloading may not be economical but if you want to learn something new by all means give it a go .

and don't forget to clean primer pockets . my father in law don't and it drives me crazy lol.

Scott
Posted by: johnnyjr

Re: help new reloaders - 01/08/15 11:18 AM

my advice is,never listen to what others tell you unless your sure that they know what they are talking about..a lot of false information is out there..
Posted by: Silver Belly62

Re: help new reloaders - 02/06/15 06:36 AM

Just getting into reloading myself, a lot of good info posted in this thread
Posted by: gamestalkertwo

Re: help new reloaders - 02/15/15 06:58 AM

Although temperature sensitivity is real, of course, it's not something that is going to KB a modern action, especially a typical varmint barrel. I've been loading with powders that are considered as very temperature sensitive for better than 30 yrs., and I'm not one to run my loads on the light side either, not by any stretch. For many years I've worked max charges up at cold temps, and at hot temps, then used them in reverse conditions, never had anything more than some obvious higher than usual pressures present, but nothing that screams danger!

In short, anyone that KB's a modern action is doing something critically wrong, and it isn't temperature causing it. They're either using the wrong powder, using a fast burning powder with the wrong data, or a heavier bullet than what the data was supposed to be for. Bottom line, it's not a temperature issue.

It boils down making sure all aspects of the components and data correlate. this is why I log my loads before I load them. That way when i finish a batch I can go back and verify that everything is what it's supposed to be. And that if I experience any high pressure signs, I can identify the cause with absolute certainty.

GS2
Posted by: edward5759

Re: help new reloaders - 03/14/15 04:42 PM

I started reloading in early 1950s when it was still considered a hazardous hobby. We did not have printed loading data or any real books on the subject. I bought several hundred pounds of the 4895 that Hodgdon was selling in the brown paper bags at the time for about .10 cents per pound it seems cheap but I was making .8 cents an hour pushing shopping carts at the time.
Since then I have owned two reloading shops making custom reloads for people in the 1960s and 1970s when the liability was not too much issue. I won a lot of bench rest matches. that was my advertising. Kept all my customers and load info on 3x5 cards.
Before we reloaded we would sweep the area then with a little dish soap hose the floor down, the dish soap would reduce static electricity on the floor area. Then with a large pan each of the reloading equipment would be washed in dish soap as well to remove static. every thing was steel and pot metal and would collect static. it was not for fear of a boom but a problem to keep dishes and scales steady. Some plastics do the same today.
we would load all lots on one day to keep humidity and loading temperature the same. we did not know how it would affect the load. Smoking was a no. I didn't like it, and never tried it!
We would make a lot of our own reamers for the dies. Many reloaders would request the reamer that the barrel maker would use for chambering for making reloading dies. Thing have changed a lot since then. Then a neighbor came over and asked for help. In his reloading room he had a TV with a football game on the TV several times I would ask a question and he was watching the TV then after a minute he would say "what" I found his distraction annoying. I left
after 15 minutes he realized I was gone. I told him that the only way I would help him if he got rid of the TV, Radio, Dog, from the reloading room first. He didn't come back for a while, till... one day he said he blew his rifle up!
[img]C:\Users\metzger5759\Documents\GUN related problems and loading[/img]
Posted by: CountryWildcat

Re: help new reloaders - 03/15/15 11:06 AM

Thanks guys. I am considering getting into reloading even though I don't shoot many rounds per year. I would just like to be more accurate. As much reading as I do there aren't a lot of places that actually list step by step process and all the equipment necessary. This site and thread have been very informative.
Posted by: sandy hicks

Re: help new reloaders - 03/26/15 12:06 PM

My absolutely dont even think about trying it rules to live by
1 pistol primers are stored in different containers than rifle primers
2 pistol and rifle powder are stored in different containers
3 ONLY ONE POWDER ON THE BENCH AT A TIME. ABSOLUTELY NO EXCEPTIONS
4 WEIGH EVERY THIRD ROUND OUT OF THE MEASURE
Posted by: rudymontana

Re: help new reloaders - 05/24/15 01:24 PM

Get your routine down and do it the same each and every time. Don't get distracted! Follow the guidelines and check each shell casing with a light to make sure it has powder and that the primer is seated correctly and flush! This also lets you know how full your cases are with different powder and that nothing went wrong while loading cases. I have only found one in 35 yrs. but, I'm glad I did. I weigh each load on the scale, I don't drop powder directly from drop charger. I'm just anal that way I want to know each load is exactly what it calls for. Enjoy reloading! Millions of people do. Rudy
Posted by: shotgun1919

Re: help new reloaders - 05/27/15 08:54 AM

When I'm loading precision/hunting rifle rounds I weigh every powder charge
Posted by: Handgunr

Re: help new reloaders - 09/30/15 02:36 PM

I'm a lot like Furhunter.....still have a mess of old targets as references.....some of old guns long gone.

I've been doing this since I was very young.....preteen come to think of it. I'm now 58 and have lived though the likes of reading Elmer Keith, Bill Jordan and Skeeter Skelton stuff over the years (couldn't get enough of it either).
I've accumulated a ton of reloading equipment & components, and I've built a special shop just to house it all. The one thing I still do after all these years, regardless of the high production reloading stuff, is still handload all my rifle rounds on a single stage press......taking every step or precaution to make sure they are the best I can do.

Like it has been mentioned here by several........learn the basics, and consider them to be your foundation going forward. Too many nowadays want to skip to the front and just start cranking and loading max. So much is missed out on as well as being dangerous. When I was a younger toad, I couldn't read enough on the subject and I'm so glad I started out that way.....

Bob
Posted by: Handgunr

Re: help new reloaders - 09/30/15 02:37 PM

I'm a lot like Furhunter.....still have a mess of old targets as references.....some of old guns long gone.

I've been doing this since I was very young.....preteen come to think of it. I'm now 58 and have lived though the likes of reading Elmer Keith, Bill Jordan and Skeeter Skelton stuff over the years (couldn't get enough of it either).
I've accumulated a ton of reloading equipment & components, and I've built a special shop just to house it all. The one thing I still do after all these years, regardless of the high production reloading stuff, is still handload all my rifle rounds on a single stage press......taking every step or precaution to make sure they are the best I can do.

Like it has been mentioned here by several........learn the basics, and consider them to be your foundation going forward. Too many nowadays want to skip to the front and just start cranking and loading max. So much is missed out on as well as being dangerous. When I was a younger toad, I couldn't read enough on the subject and I'm so glad I started out that way.....

Bob
Posted by: Handgunr

Re: help new reloaders - 09/30/15 02:38 PM

I'm a lot like Furhunter.....still have a mess of old targets as references.....some of old guns long gone.

I've been doing this since I was very young.....preteen come to think of it. I'm now 58 and have lived though the likes of reading Elmer Keith, Bill Jordan and Skeeter Skelton stuff over the years (couldn't get enough of it either).
I've accumulated a ton of reloading equipment & components, and I've built a special shop just to house it all. The one thing I still do after all these years, regardless of the high production reloading stuff, is still handload all my rifle rounds on a single stage press......taking every step or precaution to make sure they are the best I can do.

Like it has been mentioned here by several........learn the basics, and consider them to be your foundation going forward. Too many nowadays want to skip to the front and just start cranking and loading max. So much is missed out on as well as being dangerous. When I was a younger toad, I couldn't read enough on the subject and I'm so glad I started out that way.....

Bob
Posted by: Handgunr

Re: help new reloaders - 09/30/15 02:42 PM

.......sorry gang, browsers been acting up
Posted by: Aiden12

Re: help new reloaders - 11/13/15 05:10 AM

I second the caution regarding "favorite" loads. When I first started I tended to want to test the max loads in the manual. I usually find better accuracy from loads that are dialed down slightly.
Posted by: COYOTEKILLERMILLER

Re: help new reloaders - 12/13/15 03:34 PM

Never ever ,..ever never Drink while reloading.
I personally don't ,.. But have a few select friends that do,.. It always catches up to them.
Posted by: john pruitt

Re: help new reloaders - 12/21/15 10:35 AM

Also keep in mind temperature a safe max load at 50 degrees may be a way to hot at 80 you have to adjust dont shoot your winter max loads on a hot summer day bad things can happen
Posted by: whitedogone

Re: help new reloaders - 01/10/16 07:52 AM

Three words.......

Case length gauge
Posted by: BEN25.06

Re: help new reloaders - 01/14/16 06:42 PM

I lock the door to the gun room 90% of the time when reloading and I have loaded some to hot but found it when I went to tag the box. 2 gr to much polled them then done it wright. After you pull 50 rounds and reload you will double check your self!!
Posted by: rainierrifleco

Re: help new reloaders - 01/17/16 03:00 PM

Keep your load within limitations....if you want 4000 out of a 22-250. For get it....brass won't last long primers loosen quicker and the extra vol wont be noticed in the field. Get a swift....
Posted by: WinDrummer

Re: help new reloaders - 01/23/16 04:42 PM

I'm pretty new to reloading compared to a lot of people here, but here are a couple pictures and description of what has worked well for me so far.

When dispensing powder, I place my prepped cases in a cartridge box and work from left to right. I first remove a row of cases and set them aside so there is always a blank space between the full case I'm setting into the box and the empty one I'm pulling from it. After the charge is weighed and poured into the brass, I take a bullet and set it upside-down inside the case mouth before transferring the cartridge into the box. This clearly marks each case that has a charge it in, preventing both squibs and double-charges. In the calibers I reload (.30-06 and .22-250) double-charges are impossible without spilling, but I'm cautious about it anyway.

I dispense powder using the volumetric powder drop that came with my Lee Classic set, dispensing it into an old .30-06 case that has a messed-up neck from a time when I rushed a bullet seating and tried to press it with the bullet cockeyed. Using this case is a constant reminder for me. The only time powder touches the actual prepped case is after the load is weighed (I weigh each load) and 2 seconds before the bullet is dropped in upside down. For .22-250, the bullets are skinny enough that they can pass through the throat of my funnel so I drop in the bullet before I even remove the funnel.

http://imgur.com/rpNoATo
http://imgur.com/kTArsgT

Happy shooting,
Mitch
Posted by: stacky43

Re: new reloaders - 02/02/16 10:27 AM

there is no better advise than this eliminate all distractions and keep your mind 100 percent on the task at hand. and write everything down.
Posted by: stacky43

Re: help new reloaders - 02/02/16 10:29 AM

there are also some good instructional compact discs. hornady etc.
Posted by: Yote Newb

Re: help new reloaders - 03/04/16 06:10 PM

Well I had nothing to do today so I decided to read this and thought I'd toss in my two cents.

We all develop our own routine. I prefer to do large batches, especially case prep, one step at a time. I include a note marking off the steps as I finish them. It may be a while before I do the next step and because of my records I know without a doubt I've completed a step or not. Once I had 1000 30-06 cases I knew I had measured the length on but didn't have a note so I did it again.

I also never touch primers. I started into reloading by loading 8mm mauser. I loaded 10 rounds at the starting load. When I was priming them I touched the primers. I had 1 squib in that batch of 10. I recognized something was off and cleared the bore before firing another round so no harm was done and I learned something and no longer touch primers. Sure it could have been a bad primer but after thousands and thousands of loads I haven't had another squib.

This was briefly mentioned but a paper clip with one end bent can be a very useful tool for inspecting cases. We all (assuming you read your manual) have heard about case heads separating. If running a paperclip inside the cases and tip hangs up on a "ridge" just above the web it's time to retire the case. But it can also hang up on dirt too. Here's a link for more info on it http://www.accurateshooter.com/technical-articles/case-head-separation-cause-diagnosis/

I didn't see this mentioned but I also RE-READ the info in the manuals from time to time. A refresher never hurts and you'll be surprised how often you'll pick up a new tid-bit of info.

I'm a big fan of headspace gauges and have one for every rifle cartridge I load.

Keep your bench clean. Some of the pictures people post of their bench make me cringe. Stacked 3 layers deep of different things seems like a bad idea to me.

I'll also say trust your gut. We all know sometimes there is something telling you that something is not quite right. I've thrown out some brass that despite all my careful inspection and found nothing wrong with my gut was still telling get rid of it. This included a decent size batch of 308 brass. Did I prevent an accident, I'll never know but I felt better by tossing it into the scrap bucket. There was another day I was going to load up a few rounds but I literally dropped everything I touched when I was getting my stuff out and ready to go. I took that as a sign that I wasn't meant to do any loading that day.

Don't reload when you're tired, sick, distracted, mad, ect. Only do it if you can give it your full, undivided attention. Also, once your a have a cold beverage you're done for the day.

I'll say this one separately but don't reload when you are in a hurry. If you are rushing to make ammo the night before a match, hunting trip, range time or whatever the case may be you're asking for trouble. Way to many problem threads start with "I was in a hurry". A little planning can save a lot of problems.
Posted by: BuckeyeSpecial

Re: help new reloaders - 03/13/16 03:41 PM

This post is not a "reply" to the previous post, but is instead a reply I wrote re the Distinction of Standard vs. Magnum primers in .223 Remington...so I am posting it at Help New Reloaders for other new reloaders' benefit:

OK, I will solve the rest of the story here as none of the other posters [after me] have done so, and I am really disappointed in them...

The magnum primer is generally recommended for:
(a)igniting all ball powders as ball powder is "relatively"
harder to ignite than other [stick-type] powders and the magnum primer has a relatively much "hotter" flame than standard primers;
(b) especially recommended when igniting a ball powder in cold weather of 0 degrees F and below;
(c) igniting larger quantities of ball powder (think .338 Win. Mag, 22/250, 308 and 30/06, etc.)

See the older Speer manuals of 1970-90s vintage for a good discussion on this.

Thus, when switching to a magnum primer for a load previously worked up to a safe maximum, one should certainly back off the same powder say 10% and work back up to a safe level with the magnum primer, especially if the loads will be used in hot summer weather - i.e ground hog hunting here in OH - as the magnum primer develops higher pressure faster than the standard primer did with the same quantity of powder. So you can't just use a nmagnum primer withe the previously safe pressure load of the standard primer and expect the same pressure! You may very well get an overload/excess pressure, and you may not! Understanding this so far.

Notice none of the other posters have mentioned any of this...and I have other things to do than type...but have answered as these others do not seem to get it although you are the rookie reloader and they allegedly are "veterans"...

That being said, the CCI 400 standard primer has done very well at igniting my ball powder of choice (Winchester 748) so I have not opted to try the CCI 450 Magmum primer...in the .223 Remington as I hunt a lot in the summer and the 400 standard works fine. BUT, if hunting coyotes in sub-zero conditions I would do so with a Magnum 450 re-worked load. You will likely benefit with a more reliable, complete powder burn...relatively.

Oh, by the way, the BR-4 costs almost twice as much now as does the standard CCI 400 or the Magnum 450, so it is more than just "pennies" as one poster claimed. The BR-4 allegedly has better "quality control" manufacturing than the 400; let CCI tell you what are the other differences between it and the 400.
Posted by: idahorob

Re: help new reloaders - 06/26/16 04:01 PM

huh i should start thinking about that more.
Posted by: rush709

Re: help new reloaders - 10/10/16 08:15 AM

A lot of info in here!

I've read through a lot of it over the past few days, very informative.

I'm about ready to start reloading, have read Lyman's twice now, and have most of the equipment at home, with the rest in the mail on the way. Was wondering what you guys would recommend as a second manual. I know there's a few good ones out there, but was wondering what ones have the most comprehensive load data from different manufacturers. Lyman gives various different bullet brands, that's more what i'm looking for rather than a brand specific manual that only covers their own products.
Posted by: GLShooter

Re: help new reloaders - 10/10/16 02:20 PM

Pretty much Internet data if you want various brand data. The Hodgdon magazine deal gives quite a few choices but the website fleshes it out much better.

Greg
Posted by: Plant.One

Re: help new reloaders - 10/10/16 02:27 PM

Originally Posted By: whitedogone
Three words.......

Case length gauge


actually 4 words - sheridan slotted ammunition gauge

this is a chamber gauge thats cut to SAAMI minimum chamber specs (which is just larger than maximum cartridge spec)

which can also function as a case gauge for checking sized brass.


if your brass (and ammo) fit this tool, any in-spec chamber will successfully work for your reloads.
Posted by: ajprice308

Re: help new reloaders - 11/02/16 11:11 PM

Backy33 look in your reloading manual and look at the velocity each load is making and if powder A. is 34 grains of powder will go 3400fps and powder B will go that same velocity but with 30 grains of powder you know powder B is a more "powerful" powder just remember though they are all powerful no matter what and always remember to not mix up Magnum and standard primers
Posted by: TKerchal8

Re: help new reloaders - 12/08/16 11:41 PM

Hey guys I got a question and it's probably on here somewhere but I got a tikka heavy barrel Varmint 22-250, I would like to use 55g nosler ballistic tip with IMR4064, but I need the load data for it min to max I also want to know how accurate that load is an anyones input or any other loads you guys may know about that would work?
Posted by: Hedge

Re: help new reloaders - 12/09/16 12:09 AM

There is no way to tell for certain if the load will be accurate in your rifle. Your rifle may or may not like the combo. For the load data, check the Hodgdon website.
Posted by: Plant.One

Re: help new reloaders - 12/09/16 01:24 AM

Originally Posted By: TKerchal8
Hey guys I got a question and it's probably on here somewhere but I got a tikka heavy barrel Varmint 22-250, I would like to use 55g nosler ballistic tip with IMR4064, but I need the load data for it min to max I also want to know how accurate that load is an anyones input or any other loads you guys may know about that would work?


the only way to really know what your gun will like and be safe with is to do a proper load developement and shoot a series of groups of slowly increasing charges while watching for pressure signs as you work up.

if you're a new reloader, i strongly suggest you invest in a reloading manual. THere's a lot more to reloading that just repriming a case and stuffing a bullet over some powder that you found as "joes best load ever" online.

since you're looking at using nosler bullets, you can find some of their data online
http://load-data.nosler.com/load-data/22-250-remington/

or even better pickup a copy of Nosler's Reloading guide 8th edition.

its going for around $26 right now.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Nosler-Reloading-Manual/2223142.uts

there's more to a reloading manual than min and max powder information and other load data.

good luck and stay safe!
Posted by: Doug Dodson

Re: help new reloaders - 01/08/17 11:58 PM

I'm just getting into reloading, and after reading the three major reloading handbooks (Nosler, Hornady and RCBS, I purchased maybe a little more than the basics, and I am working on a reloading room. I am single, 68 yrs old, and I have the luxury of an adequate space in a tool storage shed that I have insulated and put in an A/C unit. It gets pretty humid here in Fla!
My questions are many, but I'll start with a bench layout...those of you that have been doing this awhile have probably drilled several holes while moving presses and chargers, etc. I don't want my bench to look like Swiss cheese, so while a lot of this is personal preference, for a right handed person is there some recommendation as to where to locate the major elements???
Posted by: Doug Dodson

Re: help new reloaders - 01/09/17 03:28 PM

Thanks so much for the list. It makes things very understandable...wish I lived in ID, or you lived in Florida, I'd like to lean over your shoulder at the bench. Also great to see your kids are involved in your hobby. I printed it off and will keep it at my new bench, until I get a routine down...Again thanks for taking the time to share...
Posted by: Doug Dodson

Re: help new reloaders - 01/09/17 03:34 PM

Thanks so much for the list. It makes things very understandable...wish I lived in ID, or you lived in Florida, I'd like to lean over your shoulder at the bench. Also great to see your kids are involved in your hobby. I printed it off and will keep it at my new bench, until I get a routine down...Again thanks for taking the time to share...
Posted by: Doug Dodson

Re: help new reloaders - 01/09/17 03:41 PM

For a newby please explain ladder loading...???
Posted by: Nonnieselman

Re: help new reloaders - 01/09/17 04:23 PM

Originally Posted By: Doug Dodson
For a newby please explain ladder loading...???


http://forum.accurateshooter.com/threads/ladder-testing.3894169/
Posted by: Strudy68

Re: help new reloaders - 01/16/17 06:09 AM

Great thread!!! Great info new guy's read and read!!!

my opinion I believe a chronograph is a must!! it tells a lot only seen it mentioned a few times..

If you read most problems (yes I said most not all) can be solved by using moderate loads yotes can't side step 3200 fps vs 3700 etc

OAL gauge is a great tool read and read on its use...

I read one guy saying that treat crimped primer brass like regular brass please correct me if I'm wrong but I strongly disagree if you don't use a primer pocket de-crimper on crimped primer brass the edges of some primers can catch and fold edge of primer over are very hard to see at times mostly only way to tell by feel while priming...

There was very little discussion on crimped brass..and there is a lot of crimped .223 mil brass out there

My two cents...
Posted by: Dan Wanfalt

Re: help new reloaders - 03/31/17 02:09 PM

I am stealing your stuff. That is golden. John Holliger says there are "two things a high power shooter shouldn't own, a borescope and a chronograph". Pressure signs are just that.
I think the most important thing for me over time has been the keeping of records. I have started writing the date, load data, cartridge overall length and how many rounds I have loaded. If you are shooting one rifle in one caliber you keep track of amount of rounds through a tube. And if you had an accurate load but forget what it was you can go back to it. A notebook just for loading tab it for your calibers and it is gold. If you croak your kids can steal your load data instead of starting over. And as we age we need records. Trust ME!
Old powders of the same nomenclature are not the same as they were 20 yrs ago. You could load old 4831 and have a mild load. New stuff has more energy and will make a bomb out of a trusted load. Just my 2 cents for the day.
Posted by: Dan Wanfalt

Re: help new reloaders - 03/31/17 02:19 PM

Sorry about that. My reply was for Buzz Be.
Posted by: Richard3

Re: help new reloaders - 07/12/18 08:01 PM

Hello ALL.NAME IS RICHARD3 AND I HOPE I'M ON THE CORRECT SITE TO ASK MY QUESTION.I'VE BEEN RELOADING FOR ALMOST 4.6 YEARS AND HAD A-LOT OF FUN SHOOTING TARGETS.CAN SOMEONE HELP ME WITH THIS? I'M SHOOTING A RUGER PRECISION .308 AND HAPPENED ON 180 EA 150 GRAIN HORNADY ROUND NOSE #3035 BULLETS FOR A VERY NICE PRICE.I USE HODGDON BLC-2 FOR MOST OF MY .308+ LOADS.MY LEE,LYMAN 49 AND HORNADY BOOKS ALL SAY C.O.A.L. IS 2.800"BUT ON A 150 JACKETED BULLET.I USE THE LOAD DATA AT HODGDENS ALOT AND MIKE SAID 2.520". VERY LITTLE DATA ON-LINE ON THIS BULLET AND POWDER COMBO.I'VE SHOT A-LOT OF 165/168 AND 125 GRAIN FMJ/BT/HP WITH BLC-2.CAN SOMEONE HELP CONFIRM THE 2.520 C.O.A.L.I'VE SEEN MAYBE 2 OTHERS REFER THAT THIS IS CORRECT.DON'T WANT A BOOMER.ANY HELP I WOULD APPRECIATE.NEW TO THE FORUM WORLD.THANKS MUCH.R3
Posted by: Plant.One

Re: help new reloaders - 07/13/18 12:32 AM

hAS aNYONE sEEN mY cAPSLOCK kEY? wink


hornady's 9th, pg 416, shows 2.520" for the hornady #3035 150gr Interlock RN, however there is no data for BLC-2.
Posted by: Garry Thomas

Re: help new reloaders - 09/06/18 02:42 PM

Very useful thread! I have learned a lot.
Posted by: David Collins

Re: help new reloaders - 05/28/19 04:27 AM

A straightforward and quick step to perform on each cartridge case can make a big difference too. By chamfering and deburring your case mouths before bullet seating, you can ensure that the bullet seats smoothly and leaves the case uniformly.
Posted by: spotstalkshoot

Re: help new reloaders - 03/10/20 03:32 PM

Follow Berger bullets seating depth testing procedure during load development.
Posted by: HOOVY

Re: help new reloaders - 04/05/20 09:06 PM

Favorite 223 powder? Just got my reloading equipment today. Going to be reloading 223 & 22-250. I prefer Varget in my 22-250. Had it reloaded by my father in law. THANKS
Posted by: Vanisher187

Re: help new reloaders - 08/18/20 09:21 AM

So im not new but i just got my own reloading set up. Biggest thing is find someone who has done it for awhile to help you. Its amazing the little things you will pick up with help. Hopefully it will help you avoid costly mistakes. Now I have seen friends blow up guns. I never try to push my loads. All i want is an accurate, reliable, safe round. I am not chasing speed, shoot im use to archery speeds. However take your time. Its not a task i would ever try to rush, or skip steps. I have had one problem with my loads. I assumes all the brass i shot was the same. However i had 3 of them from the batch that were too long. After having to send the gun to the smith to have a case removed. I learned you can never be too thorough with reloading.
Posted by: SnowmanMo

Re: help new reloaders - 08/29/20 09:38 PM

The best advice I can give a new reloader, is to take it slow, and do your research.

Begin with the end in mind. What do want this handload to accomplish for you? Then research your powders and bullets that are suitable for what you want to achieve. Load up 5-10 with a particular recipe and then head to the range. Invest in a chronograph, and remember to take good notes while at the range. This is going to give you valuable information as to what you need to change in your recipe to achieve your desired goal. Then go back and make your recipe changes and load some more rounds then back to the range.

Handloading requires patience. You better be ready to spend a lot of time at the range, bummer right?

Handloading is a lot of experimenting. It is a very scientific process.

You will find a lot of very good guys here willing to share their knowledge and help to make your handloading successful.
Posted by: Zastava223rem

Re: help new reloaders - 12/03/20 11:06 PM

Originally Posted By: HOOVY
Favorite 223 powder? Just got my reloading equipment today. Going to be reloading 223 & 22-250. I prefer Varget in my 22-250. Had it reloaded by my father in law. THANKS


For .223 in autoloading rifles, I prefer ball powders like H335. It is pretty much the go-to but Ramshot TAC and Reloader 10X are excellent too. For bolt guns, IMR4198 or H4198, Hodgdons Benchmark (my favorite), RL7, Accurate LT30 and probably more that I am forgetting.

Varget works okay with heavier bullets but may be lacking for 60 grs or lighter. Reloader 15 is the same story.
Posted by: Don Fischer

Re: help new reloaders - 01/05/21 11:29 AM

I think the first way to go for reloading newbe's is to learn with the directions in one manual first. Do that and you'll learn to make safe loads and probably be some good ones too. Then once your really comfortable start looking for ways to tune your loads if you like. I found when I started that doing it the mundane way gave me good hunting accuracy, like all my rifles got down to 1" @ 100yds or better. I don't do near the tuning other do and today I have several 1/2" rifles. The tuning improve's usually just a bit at a time. But, learn to make good safe loads before you start much experimenting. Always nice to have some sort of reference for what your doing.

By the way, I said use one manual to start. Reason for that is they all say pretty much the same thing but in different ways. Learn one way to start!
Posted by: Sgt_Mike

Re: help new reloaders - 06/06/21 04:49 PM

Being the Lazy Indivdual I am.

I have failed to read the 20 pages for this 1st piece of advise... ( I need to note upfront I have stolen images from all over the internet to make my points and to assist in explaining forgive me as I have sinned)

everyone has discussed loading practices such as load for the
a. most accurate versus velocity.
b. Stay within published data,
c. drop starting loads approx 10%,
d. work loads up slowly,
e. don't seat bullet into lands but allow 15 to 20 thousands jump before engaging lands
.. I can't stress my advocation for this enough.

This is a hobby that feeds another hobby and should be fun NOT a chore.


In another post I seen the question of the term handloading versus reloading. "aren't they the same " I seen as a response. years ago one of my buddies and I had this same conversation in my office. Here is what we came up with between two wildcat handloaders.

Hand loading is basically working out the formula to the desire accuracy level given a set platform (gun) and componets.... Reloading is duplicating that same formula once developed without thought

Now I will discuss more advanced methods they are NOT REQUIRED, but are placed here for knowledge sake only, MOST will not have need for these Why post this ?? hopefully as the novices become more accustomed to the practice they might find this small primer helpful in producing better quality.

Brass preparation is in my opinion first and formost and it is easy to control.

1. Annealing!!!!!! I have seen Posted on the internet about using a oven to anneal, not here!! but on other forums

DONT do it !!!!!!!!!!!!

It will / can weaken the WHOLE case including the web resulting in disassembling your fire arm without the use of a screwdriver or tools maybe even a bolt in the eye socket. Of course this is a extreme example ...badddd stuff. Now some advise to use a oven to dry brass, I don't do this ever and will call B/S. why you ask? is my oven calibrated??/ no!!! what if I leave them in too long??? (anyone whom has done heat treating knows the answer you have a probablity of annealed the whole case) we will need the case head to remnain strong the brass case is a gasket therefore it need malability to seal the charge being iniated to send that happy little bullet along it's way

Annealing is usually done to extend the neck life and prevent spliting at the neck mostly done when forming brass. And is actually easy to do.

Should you anneal?? the answer is no/yes that depends on your practices.
Do I anneal yes I do.. when??? about every five loadings. Now on the 223 I usually dont unless converting to another case by necking up or down. 223/5.56 brass is so available and cheap so no need. Just wasting my time as in this cartriage I'm feeding a AR .... remember fun not a chore.

Harder to find cases i.e. 244 remington aka 6mm remington yes I anneal to extend the case life. And my quanity of this type brass is way lower count than my 5.56 /223 quanity.
annealing is used to soften the brass, as brass is worked (resized) it hardens, annealing adds malability back to the brass at the neck shoulder location.
here is a article that goes further into detail actually a LOT into detail probably way more than a novice needs.
https://www.6mmbr.com/annealing.html

My personal advice if a novice wishes to anneal is to use the water pan annealing method .. it's safer,, easier,, and cheaply done. and I run the water a bit higher than shown





2. Case head seperation
since we cant anneal the whole case one needs to pay attention to case head seperation a paper clip can be form as a inspection tool to feel for this, but is not required as usually the primer pocket will loosen first, auto loader are the worst for this. Especially when Small base sizing are used this is compounded with the sloppy chamer used for reliable loading. Bolt gun owner Ignore this you probably wont have a problem unless you use range brass alot from auto loaders, Or use a Belted magnum cartridge such as those based off the 300 H&H (7mm mag 300 Win Mag shooters you use that case as a basis) . Machine guns are the worst.

Here is the paper clip tool

here is a article relating to that
http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2013/01/case-head-separation-causes-and-how-to-spot-problems/

If you suspect this as in feel it toss the case is my best advice.

3. NECK turning
IS IT needed??/ Majority of the TIME NOOO!!!
When is it need?? custom chamber with tight neck or done in small quanity to ring out that last nth of accuracy. Why nth degree? it casues the neck Tension to be uniform 98% this is just not needed. Again this should be fun NOT a chore. do I do it ???? yes I do but I actually enjoy doing it... MOST DONT

Another thing I do is Load at the bench, the local range here allows it.

I'll also do ladder test to find a accuracy node, which each bullet is loaded progressive a little hotter ( I use 1/2 grain unless it is a hot cartridge such as the dreaded 5.7 FN then I use a tenth grain) in order to find the two or three close together that give me a idea of where that node is. The novice will want to adjust scope leave it alone folks we need to see the dispersion and create the ladder. As the velocity increases the point of the bullet impact will be lower ( bullet is traveling faster thus gravity has less effect, doesnt sound right i know i see your rca dog look now,


but true because of angle of departure of bore centerline) here is a example by Hm1996 in one of his post





Below here is a example of a ladder test

Now with this example my node should be within 43.5 grains to 45.0 grains.
Why do I use the ladder test I burn LESS powder find that node I have only loaded 1 of each charge versus three to five of each charge searching for that magic grouping. now generally I'll target the middle of that node so right around 44 to 44.5grs , i'll shoot a conformation group. Once i have the best load I'll play with the seating depth Sometimes the recomended length is the best sometimes longer sometimes shorter but brand of bullet will dictate. Another key point is DOCUMENT EVERY LOAD AND RESULTS

I'll briefly discuss something.... I'll use a "fouling shot" on a clean barrel in my least charge in other words two rounds loaded the exact same. WHY you ask???? simple I don't care if you subscribe to "clean bore" or "cold shooter" camp it will help you in your evaluation attempts. DISCARD that first shot always. X it out on the target and ignore it doesnt matter I DON'T care why it done what it did or why the point of impact is differant. Another point is once this load is developed it should produce very closely to the same results if it differs a little bit its probably ok. As we are not loading benchrest shooting for score or groups we are after killing Vermin I think.

Charging the case with powder I use a powder measure Some will trickle the load to exactly the same weight. that is great if we are benchrest shooting. In my Highpower days I weighed everything to the nth degree. I spent more time loading than shooting I actually found out that If I load to volume as in using a powder measure it was quicker produced Just as good a result
REMEMBER FUN !!! NOT A CHORE this is a hobby that feeds my shooting hobby

I could go on and on... but I'll stop for now but will leave this link to a article by Orkan http://www.predatormastersforums.com/for...8218&page=1
I am in hopes that this helps some to understand or maybe maybe one or two methods I use will assist others in the enjoyment of this hobby. All opinions are my own and maybe biased maybe some might find racist only cuz i like black rifles as well as bolt guns (haha tt2 I crack myself up sometimes) But honestly best of luck to all in your persuits of this Hobby (s) of Handloading, Reloading Shooting, shooting vermin, rodents, Yotes or whatever
Posted by: Sgt_Mike

Re: help new reloaders - 06/06/21 06:10 PM

Originally Posted By: Zastava223rem
Originally Posted By: HOOVY
Favorite 223 powder? Just got my reloading equipment today. Going to be reloading 223 & 22-250. I prefer Varget in my 22-250. Had it reloaded by my father in law. THANKS


For .223 in autoloading rifles, I prefer ball powders like H335. It is pretty much the go-to but Ramshot TAC and Reloader 10X are excellent too. For bolt guns, IMR4198 or H4198, Hodgdons Benchmark (my favorite), RL7, Accurate LT30 and probably more that I am forgetting.

Varget works okay with heavier bullets but may be lacking for 60 grs or lighter. Reloader 15 is the same story.


Hoovy I'll echo for 55grs and less Shell shuckers..YES H335, H332, TAC, 10X, Benchmark, I picked up a Lb of AA2015 just can't recommend right now until I try it ( but H335 is my preferred). For 69 to 80grs in the shell shuckers with a fast twist (anything faster than 1-12") CFE 223, Win 748, Varget.
Posted by: bigdog1

Re: help new reloaders - 09/08/21 07:27 PM

I always empty my powder hopper after each loading session, If not, I ALWAYS put a piece of tape on it saying what powder is in it.
Posted by: Plant.One

Re: help new reloaders - 09/08/21 09:08 PM

Originally Posted By: bigdog1
I always empty my powder hopper after each loading session, If not, I ALWAYS put a piece of tape on it saying what powder is in it.


had a friend that went that route - didnt think that humdidity would be an issue.

the powder got all kinds of stuck inside his powder dispenser (Chargemaster).

took us over an hour to clean it out when i went to help him change over to a different powder for something else when i was helping show him a few things.

we threw out over a pound of powder and thankfully there appears to be no permanant damage to the dispenser, but still.
Posted by: Stu Farish

Re: help new reloaders - 09/09/21 08:04 PM

My rule is to only have one powder & one primer on the bench, period.

I agree it's best to put the unused away, but even so, with only one powder can & one primer package on the bench there's never any doubt as to what's in use.